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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 12 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 18 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 14 10 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 3 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Quincy (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Quincy (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 6 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ne. . . . We may perhaps detect in this sonnet a squint at a movement made, during a pause in the last session at Chardon Street, to hold a convention to consider the authority of the Scriptures, and the extent of their obligation on men, Lib. 11.178; 12.3, 51. in which the Transcendentalists Emerson and Alcott were united as a committee with Edmund Quincy and Mrs. Chapman. That Mr. Garrison was not in sympathy with it seems likely from his disclaimer of Lib. 11.183. responsibility for Quincy's justification of it, which was allowed to be copied from the Non-Resistant into the Lib Lib. 11.183. erator, and in which one remarks not only Mr. Quincy's emancipation from the supernatural sanction of the Bible, but his exposition of the way in which the question of its authority was forced on thoughtful minds by clerical Cf. ante, 1.463, note 2. opposition to reform. The sonnet on Holy Time is a reflection of the poem, Ante, 2.153. True Rest. We cite the close of it: Dear is th
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
Dedham, November 6, 1843. Ms. I have sent in to you my concluding article on Leavitt, See the whole series of articles, discussing anew the embezzlement of the Emancipator, in which Quincy had the help of D. L. Child, and compelled notice at the hands of Leavitt, Torrey, Elizur Wright, and Lewis Tappan (Lib. 13: 165, 169, 170, 171, 174, 179, 185, 201). The Whig papers eagerly copied the attacks on their Liberty Party opponents, who all in turn had a hearing in the Liberator, though Quincy's arraignments were carefully excluded from the Emancipator (Ms. Nov. 27, 1843, Quincy to R. D. Webb). which Lib. 13.179. I hope will meet with your gracious approbation. This, I Joshua Leavitt. presume, will terminate my editorial labors for the present, and I gladly resign my share of the vice-regal throne to its legitimate possessor. I congratulate you, and all the friends of the cause at the same time, upon your restoration to health and your ancient occupation. May you live long
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
nal Committee of the Society. The British friends of the cause had no difficulty in Lib. 15.66, 98. arriving at a clear judgment of the issue raised in New Hampshire; We were much pleased to find, wrote Quincy to R. D. Webb, on Jan. 30, 1845, that you agreed so entirely with us about the Rogers business. Your idea of French and his having behaved like spoiled children is exactly correct (Ms.). Webb, the writer goes on to note, had formed his opinion from the printed controversy before Quincy's private version reached him. Cf. Lib. 17: 1. but not so a portion of the abolitionists (in Rhode Island particularly) whose personal attachment to Lib. 14.207. Rogers was very warm. These not even the refusal of French to print in the Herald the overwhelmingly adverse Lib. 14.199. decision of the Society, nor his abrupt discontinuance of Lib. 14.199. the paper and refusal to surrender the subscription lists, following Leavitt's Emancipator example, could disenchant. A new schism res
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
Winthrop's acceptance of the Ante, p. 139. war afford a sufficient handle to the Conscience Whigs (as Ms. Sept. 30, 1846, F. Jackson to W. L. G. Charles Francis Adams denominated those who were not Cotton Whigs) to deprive him of a renomination. The Cotton Whigs swept the State. One heard Daniel Webster proclaim in Faneuil Hall: I am for the Constitution as our fathers left it to us, and standing by it and dying by it. Lib. 16.182. But also one heard John Quincy Adams, from his home in Quincy, deny that there was anything left to Lib. 16.194. stand by: The Constitution of the United States—stat magni nominis umbra. This quotation, said the editor of the Liberator, indicates pretty clearly the position and Lib. 16.194. feelings of this venerable statesman in regard to the American Union. . . . Then if it be only a shadow that is left to us, it is at best but a mockery, and ought not to be treated as a reality. . . . Let Daniel Webster, the greatest and meanest of his countrymen
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
the wants, wrongs, and oppressions of our own age and our own country. Lib. 17.3. And since then, on his journeys as General Agent of the Massachusetts Society, he had perceived that it was much more difficult to get the ear of the people at large, in order to lay before them the story of the wrongs and sufferings of their enslaved countrymen, on the first day of the week than on any other Lib. 18.67.—thus making Sunday not the best but the worst day of the week. Contrary to Phillips's and Quincy's Ante, pp. 218, 219. view, therefore, anti-Sabbatarianism must, for abolitionists, be allowed to have been a moral rather than a theological reform. As for Mr. Garrison himself, his emancipation from the traditional views of the Sabbath proceeded on lines already displayed in this narrative; and Ante, 2.51, 107-114, 152-154; 3.3, 9, 65. as far back as the summer of 1844, remarking the roving commission of the Rev. Justin Edwards, D. D., of Andover, for a year past, to enforce Sabbataria
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
The gubernatorial messages of the three leading Republican States, at the opening of the year, gave dismal foreboding of what would attend Republican successes in 1860. Governor Morgan of New York proclaimed the readiness E. D. Morgan. of that State to submit if the voice of the country should Lib. 29.6. prove to be for slavery extension. The ambitious Governor of Ohio, Salmon P. Chase, a political huckster who hopes to carry his principles to the Presidential market Lib. 29.107. (in Quincy's phraseology), was silent on the absorbing Lib. 29.6. national topic; in Massachusetts, Governor Banks, a Presidential baby at nurse, Lib. 29.107. was equally dumb. Later on, both Chase and Banks prevented their respective legislatures from passing laws such as Vermont had enacted Lib. 28.199; 29.22, 44, 122. to make the trial or rendition of slaves impossible on her soil. In the summer of 1858, Mr. Garrison (in company with the Rev. Samuel May, Jr., and the Rev. N. R. Johnston, pasto