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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 81 31 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Rochester (New York, United States) or search for Rochester (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 56 results in 38 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
rtioned; and, to this end, that the Representatives of the whole nation shall consist of 400 persons. or not above; and in each county, and the places thereto subjoined, there shall be chosen, to make up the said Representatives at all times, the several numbers here mentioned, viz.: Representatives in England. Kent, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named, 10 ; Canterbury, with the Suburbs adjoining and Liberties thereof, 2; Rochester, with the Parishes of Chatham and Stroud, 1; The Cinque Ports in Kent and Sussex, viz., Dover, Romney, Hythe, Sandwich, Hastings, with the Towns of Rye and Winchelsea, 3. Sussex, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Chichester, 8 Chichester, with the Suburbs and Liberties thereof, 1. Southampton County, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 8 ; Winchester, with the Suburbs and Liberties thereof, 1; Southampton Town and t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Martin Brewer, 1815- (search)
Anderson, Martin Brewer, 1815- Educator; born in Brunswick, Me., Feb. 12, 1815; was of Scotch descent on his father's side; was graduated at Waterville (now Colby) College in 1840; and in 1850 became editor and part proprietor of the New York Recorder, a Baptist publication. A university having been established at Rochester by the Baptists, he was called to the presidency of it in 1853. and held the office till 1889. In 1868 he was offered the presidency of Brown University, but declined it. He was one of the most efficient incorporators and earlier trustees of Vassar College. He died Feb. 26, 1890.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anti-Masonic party. (search)
n Sept. 11 Morgan was seized at Batavia, upon a criminal charge, by a company of men who came from Canandaigua. He was taken to that place, tried and acquitted on the criminal charge, but was immediately arrested on a civil process for a trifling debt. He was cast into jail there, and the next night was discharged by those who procured his arrest, taken from prison at nine o'clock at night, and at the door was seized and thrust into a carriage in waiting, which was driven rapidly towards Rochester. He was taken by relays of horses, by the agency of several individuals, to Fort Niagara, at the mouth of the Niagara River, and deposited in the powder magazine there. It was known that the freemasons had made violent attempts to suppress Morgan's announced book, and this outrage was charged upon the fraternity. A committee was appointed, at a public meeting held at Batavia, to endeavor to ferret out the perpetrators of the outrage. They found evidences of the existence of what they b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
Pittsburg, Pa.321,616238,61782,999 New Orleans, La.287,104242,03945,065 Detroit, Mich.285,704205,87678,828 Milwaukee, Wis.285,315204,46880,847 Washington, D. C.278,718230,39248,326 Newark, N. J.246,070181,83064,240 Jersey City, N. J.206,433163,00343,430 Louisville, Ky.204,731161,12943,602 Minneapolis, Minn.202,718164,73837,980 Providence, R. I.175,597132,14643,451 Indianapolis, Ind.169,164105,43663,728 Kansas City, Mo.163,752132,71631,036 St. Paul, Minn.163,065133,15629,909 Rochester, N. Y.162,608133,89628,712 Denver, Col.133,859106,71327,146 Toledo, O.131,82281,43450,388 Allegheny, Pa.129,896105,28724,609 Columbus, O.125,56088,15037,410 Worcester, Mass.118,42184,65533,766- Syracuse, N. Y.108,37488,14320,231 New Haven, Conn.108,02781,29826,729 Paterson, N. J.105,17178,34726,824 Fall River, Mass.104,86374,39830,465 St. Joseph, Mo.102,97952,32450,655 Omaha, Neb.102,555140,452*37,897 Los Angeles, Cal.102,47950,39552,084 Memphis, Tenn.102,32064,49537,825 Scranton
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custom-house, (search)
Plymouth. Salem. Michigan—Detroit, Grand Haven, Grand Rapids. Marquette, Port Huron. Minnesota—Duluth, St. Paul. Mississippi—Natchez, Shieldsborough, Vicksburg. Missouri—Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis. Montana—Fort Benton. Nebraska—Omaha. New Hampshire—Portsmouth. New Jersey—Bridgeton, Newark, Perth Amboy, Somers Point, Trenton, Tuckerton. New York—Albany, Buffalo, Cape Vincent, Dunkirk, New York, Ogdensburg, Oswego, Patchogue, Plattsburg, Port Jefferson, Rochester, Sag Harbor, Suspension Bridge. North Carolina—Beaufort, Edenton, Newberne, Wilmington. Ohio–Cincinnati, Columbus, Cleveland, Sandusky, Toledo. Oregon–Astoria, Empire City, Portland, Yaquina. Pennsylvania–Erie, Philadelphia, Pittsburg. Rhode Island—Bristol, Newport, Providence. South Carolina—Beaufort, Charleston, Georgetown. Tennessee—Chattanooga, Memphis. Texas–Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Eagle Pass, El Paso, Galveston. Vermont—Bur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dalzell, Robert M., -1873 (search)
Dalzell, Robert M., -1873 Inventor; born near Belfast, Ireland, in 1793; was driven into exile with his family by the Irish Rebellion of 1798, and came to New York. In 1826 he settled in Rochester, N. Y., where he became a millwright. Later he invented and introduced the elevator system for handling and storing grain. He died in Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 22, 1873. Dalzell, Robert M., -1873 Inventor; born near Belfast, Ireland, in 1793; was driven into exile with his family by the Irish Rebellion of 1798, and came to New York. In 1826 he settled in Rochester, N. Y., where he became a millwright. Later he invented and introduced the elevator system for handling and storing grain. He died in Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 22, 1873.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dickson, John, 1783-1852 (search)
Dickson, John, 1783-1852 Statesman; born in Keene, N. H., in 1783; graduated at Middlebury College in 1808; practised law in Rochester, N. Y., in 1813-25; member of Congress in 1831-35. He is credited with having delivered the first important anti-slavery speech ever made in Congress. He published Remarks on the presentation of several petitions for the abolition of slavery and the slave-trade in the District of Columbia. He died in West Bloomfield, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1852.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Douglass, Frederick, 1817- (search)
lavery at the age of twenty-one years, and, going to New Bedford, married, and supported himself by day-labor on the wharves and in work shops. In 1841 he spoke at an anti-slaver convention at Nantucket, and soon after wards was made the agent of the Massachusetts Anti-slavery Society. He lectured extensively in New England, and, going to Great Britain, spoke in nearly all the large towns in that country on the subject of slavery. On his return, in 1847, he began the publication, at Rochester, N. Y., of the North Star (afterwards Frederick Douglass's paper). In 1870 he Frederick Douglass. became editor of the National era at Washington City; in 1871 was appointed assistant secretary of the commission to Santo Domingo; then became one of the Territorial Council of the District of Columbia; in 1876-81 was United States marshal for the District; in 1881-86 was n recorder of deeds there; and in 1889-91 was United States minister to Haiti. He we was author of Narrative of my experien
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eastman, Harvey Gridley, 1832- (search)
Eastman, Harvey Gridley, 1832- Educator; born in Marshall, Oneida co., N. Y., Oct. 16, 1832; after attending the common schools of his neighborhood, completed his education at the State Normal School at Albany; and at the age of twenty-three opened a commercial school at Oswego, N. Y., having been a teacher in a similar school kept by his uncle in Rochester. In that school he first conceived the plan of a commercial or business college. On Nov. 3, 1859, Mr. Eastman opened a business college in Poughkeepsie, with a single pupil. In 1865 there were more than 1,700 students in the college. It was the first institution in which actual business was taught. Mr. Eastman was a very liberal and enterprising citizen, foremost in every judicious measure which promised to benefit the community in which he lived. He was twice elected mayor of the city, and held that office at the time of his death, in Denver, Col., July 13, 1878. On the day of his funeral the city was draped in mournin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ely, Alfred, 1815-1892 (search)
Ely, Alfred, 1815-1892 Lawyer; born in Lyme, Conn., Feb. 18, 1815; settled in Rochester, N. Y., in 1835; admitted to the bar in 1841; member of Congress in 1859-63. He was taken prisoner by the Confederates while visiting the battle-field of Bull Run in July, 1861, and confined in Libby prison for six months; was then exchanged for Charles J. Faulkner, the minister to France, who had been arrested for disloyalty. While in Libby prison he kept a journal, which was later published as the Jo. Y., in 1835; admitted to the bar in 1841; member of Congress in 1859-63. He was taken prisoner by the Confederates while visiting the battle-field of Bull Run in July, 1861, and confined in Libby prison for six months; was then exchanged for Charles J. Faulkner, the minister to France, who had been arrested for disloyalty. While in Libby prison he kept a journal, which was later published as the Journal of Alfred Ely, a prisoner of War in Richmond. He died in Rochester, N. Y., May 18, 1892.
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