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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 21, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing). You can also browse the collection for Romeo (Michigan, United States) or search for Romeo (Michigan, United States) in all documents.

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Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 1 (search)
ave me associations with the day of empty formalities, and arbitrary restrictions; but though the forbidden book or walk always seemed more charming then, I was seldom tempted to disobey.— This Sunday—I was only eight years old—I took from the book-shelf a volume lettered Shakspeare. It was not the first time I had looked at it, but before I had been deterred from attempting to read, by the broken appearance along the page, and preferred smooth narrative. But this time I held in my hand Romeo and Juliet long enough to get my eye fastened to the page. It was a cold winter afternoon. I took the book to the parlor fire, and had there been seated an hour or two, when my father looked up and asked what I was reading so intently. Shakspeare, replied the child, merely raising her eye from the page. Shakspeare,—that won't do; that's no book for Sunday; go put it away and take another. I went as I was bid, but took no other. Returning to my seat, the unfinished story, the personag