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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 834 834 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 436 332 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 178 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 153 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 130 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 126 112 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 116 82 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 110 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 76 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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lonel Stedman, who commands a battalion of five hundred men chosen from General Gregg's division. The night was dark and the rain, that continued to fall, was mingled with sleet. Custer, who followed with a thousand men, composing the remnant of his command, got lost in thick gloom. For some time they endeavored to blunder through a deep and muddy ravine, into which they had strayed, but when they thought of two pieces of artillery, all hope of getting through with them was given up. Stedman with his five hundred men continued on their course, which, luckily for them, was correct, and about four o'clock on Tuesday morning they reached our infantry pickets, inside of Madison Court-House. Custer finding it impossible to proceed further, bivouacked that night in the woods, while he baited his horses and refreshed his men. General Stuart, with two thousand cavalrymen of Wickham's and Fitz-Hugh Lee's brigades, was marching toward his rear. The next morning about nine o'clock Ge