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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 834 834 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 436 332 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 178 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 153 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 130 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 126 112 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 116 82 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 110 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 76 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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loss of any one regiment in any one action of the war. Before the site where Fort Stedman was subsequently built 635 men were killed and wounded out of nine hundred e64. Charles G. Harrer, Kennesaw Mountain June 27, 1864. Hiram Burnham, Fort Harrison September 30, 1864. Samuel A. Rice, Jenkins' Ferry July 6, 1864. Danieorts incomplete Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-3, 186412,000Reports incomplete Petersburg, Va., June 15-30, 18642,0139,9354,62116,569Estimated loss in Hill's Corps and F, Va., Sept. 19, 18646973,9833385,0182761,8271,8183,921 Chaffin's Farm and Forts Harrison and Gilmer, Va., Sept. 29-30, 18643832,2996453,327No full report of losses Gilmer, Va., Sept. 29-30, 18643832,2996453,327No full report of losses Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 18646443,4301,5915,6653201,5401,0502,910 Franklin, Tenn., Nov. 30, 18641891,0331,1042,3361,75038007026,252 Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 15-16mattox, Va., Mar. 29–Apr. 9, 18651,3167,7501,71410,780No report of losses Petersburg, Va., Apr. 2, 18656253,1893264,140No report of losses Confederate genera
eceived in other volumes. (consult Index.) This is true of all the army leaders not separately described in the pages that follow. The Index will refer to treatment in other volumes. Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott was born near Petersburg, Virginia, June 13, 1786. After being graduated from William and Mary College, he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and then entered the army at the age of twenty-two. His career was one of bravery and incident. He was captured by the Britishrmy Corps in the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, and of the Twenty-fourth Army Corps in the Army of the James, to the command of which army he succeeded Major-General B. F. Butler in January, 1865. He was wounded in the assault on Fort Harrison, but did not give up his command. Ord was retired with full rank of major-general in 1880, and died July 22, 1883, in Havana, Cuba. Twenty-fifth Army Corps Created December 3, 1864, to consist of the colored troops of the Tenth and Eig
d had temporary command of Hardee's Corps. He continued to hold his division in Cheatham's Corps, and at the battle of Franklin was killed, November 30, 1864. A brilliant charge at Chickamauga earned him the title of Stonewall of the West, and it was he who initiated the Order of the Southern Cross and was among the first to urge the advantages to the Confederates of colored troops. Confederate generals no. 7 Georgia (continued) Philip Cook leader in Gordon's attack on Fort Stedman. William M. Gardner, commander of the Post of Richmond, Va., in 1865. John K. Jackson, commanded a Reserve Corps Army of the Mississippi. Claudius C. Wilson, led a brigade in the Army of Tennessee. Isaac M. St. John, Commissary General, 1865. Bryan M. Thomas, led a brigade of Alabamians. G. Moxley Sorrell, staff officer with Longstreet. Dudley M. Dubois, led a brigade in Longstreet's Corps. Marcellus A. Stovall, led a brigade in Hood's Corps. Lucius J. Gartrell, led