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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 834 834 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 436 332 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 178 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 153 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 130 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 126 112 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 116 82 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 110 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 76 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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tandard in a few days. This morning, about 7 o'clock, some one rung the town bell, and a crowd of citizens gathered and rushed upon the State Journal office, turning the contents into the streets, breaking up furniture, &c. The Mayor was sent for, but arrived too late to stop the mob. Gov. Vance was sent for, and made another speech. The crowd dispersed, and all is quiet now. No further deeds of violence need be feared from the citizens if the soldiers are restrained, but any further such demonstrations by them will cause another outbreak, and there is no telling where it will end. [The State Journal, which is mentioned in the above report, is a loyal Southern paper, which has been most determined in denouncing the treacherous course of the Standard. It is to this fact, doubtless, that it owes the demolition of its types, &c., by the supporters of that sheet. It is stated that Holden, the proprietor of the Standard, was in Petersburg, Va., at the time of the occurrence.]