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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
wn columns, showed that very little of his salary had reached him, that much was due him, and that he forgave much. On Sept. 7, 1842, he writes to H. C. Wright (Ms.): To-morrow I must go to my native village to hunt up some means of support, having received only half-a-dozen chairs and a bureau as my first quarter's salary. Meantime he had given up the Ms. Mar. 14, 1841, Rogers to W. L. G. law, in which his career might have been brilliant. He had likewise broken with the church at Plymouth, N. H., —excommunicated it, as Quincy said, and as was, Ms. Jan. 30, 1841, to J. A. Collins. indeed, the fashion of a come-outer period. He was, furthermore, in sympathy with that spirit of no-organization which we have seen manifested at the Chardon-Street Convention, and which had now to be combated by the abolitionists along with new organization. No-organization and come-outerism were twin brothers; protests, both, against pro-slavery clerical and ecclesiastical despotism. But the ra
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
be necessary. It may be you cannot control it, but I beg that all your influence be given to [that end]. I have urged our noble friend G. to go up [as] soon as possible, Garrison. and I hope he will,—and so has Quincy, Phillips, Mrs. Chapman, and others,—to see all, hear all, and, if it be possible, settle all. We all intend to go up to the convention this month, when I most sincerely trust you will be well, and the Herald difficulty settled. N. P. Rogers to W. L. Garrison. Plymouth [N. H.], Nov. 19, 1844. Ms. dear Garrison: The air here so tends to revive me, they will not consent I should return yet to Concord. I hope this will reach you in season to prevent your riding there in expectation of meeting me. I wanted to see you much. Your article Ante, p. 122. on the attack of Foster, dear G., will have the effect to terminate the publishing of the Herald of Freedom. Poor John has had his J. R. French. hands full to worry along with it thus far. This will cripple h