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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 340 340 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 202 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 177 51 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 142 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 131 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 130 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 89 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 73 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) or search for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 3 document sections:

A regiment of Greybeards. The Thirty-seventh regiment of Iowa volunteers (known as the Greybeard regiment ) left St. Louis on Monday for the South. A striking peculiarity of this regiment is, that nearly all its members, officers and men, are over forty-five years of age. Three fourths of them are grey-headed, and many have long white beards, giving them a venerable appearance. Many have sent their sons to the field, and are now following them. One of the arts by which the Southern heart is fired is this: Soon after the battle of Murfreesboro, the rebel General Bragg caused to be printed and widely circulated in the army counterfeits of the Nashville Union, in which was conspicuously displayed Startling News! Four States Seceded from the Old Government! Missouri, Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky! This was followed by an editorial bewailing the loss of these States. Of course the whole affair was a forgery, but the illiterate soldiery of the South, a large proportion of wh
Our country's call. to the patriotic women of St. Louis. Come, sisters! in this noble strife Join every heart and hand! There's work for each and every one-- And shall we listless, idly stand? List to the widow's piercing shriek! Oh! hear the orphan's piteous cry! Watch the pale wife as o'er his couch She bends to catch the parting sigh. Shall we, Columbia's daughters, sit, With hearts unmoved and listless air, Nor aid our brothers, husbands, sons, Our country's flag to nobly bear? Forbid it, heaven! on thee we call In this dark hour of deep distress! Oh! give us true and loyal hearts, And words of cheer and tenderness. We cannot wear the glittering sword, And gain the laurel wreath of fame, Or raise upon some gory field, For warlike deeds, a deathless name; But we can go with gentle words, With acts of kindness and of love, To some brave heart — some suffering one-- And point him to a home above. Our hands can soothe the aching brow, And wipe the tears which freely fl
She comes from St. Louis! by Edna Dean Proctor. On the sixteenth of July, 1868, the steamboat Imperial arrived at New-Orleans from St. Louis, the first boat between the cities for more than two years. She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She lies at the levee unmarred by a scar! Nok her, nor chain set to bar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louireedom and wealth from afar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. LouiSt. Louis! The river is free! What tidings of glory, New-Orleans, for thee! Oh! welcome her I herald the t. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! Our torpor is o'er; We breathe the fresh ar triumph can hinder or mar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. LouiSt. Louis! Away with the plea That river or people divided may be! One current sweeps past us, one likenesll bear; All hail to the day without malice or jar!-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah![2 more...]