hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 340 340 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 202 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 177 51 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 142 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 131 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 130 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 89 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 73 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) or search for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 8 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
ats would be useless to co-operate with the Army in the West, as the Confederates would establish heavy forts all along the rivers, and knock the vessels to pieces; in April, 1862, after the war had progressed for a year, General Leonidas Polk seized upon tie heights near Belmont, Ky., and mounting heavy guns there blocked the way for Army transports from Cairo to the sea. Then the Army began to talk of improvising a Navy of their own, and the Navy Department sent Commander John Rodgers to St. Louis to superintend the construction of an army flotilla. While the North had its Ericsson, the West was fortunate in possessing, in the person of Mr. James B. Eads, the very man for the occasion. Mr. Eads undertook to build seven large gun-boats, heavily plated on the bow and lighter on the sides. which were calculated to carry very heavy ordnance. It is strange how slowly even the cleverest of men receive new ideas. These gunboats, intended for service in the smooth waters of the wes
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
n fell. Halleck and others were making great strategic movements, which amounted to nothing, but Grant kept his mind steadily fixed on these two forts, knowing the effect their fall would have. On the 23d of January Grant visited Halleck at St. Louis, and urgently requested permission to make the attempt to take Forts Henry and Donelson; both of which General C. F. Smith, who had made a reconnoissance, reported could easily be done. The gun-boats at that time were subject to General Halle, commanding the Western flotilla, to proceed up the Tennessee River, and anchor some five miles below Fort Henry, blockading the river at that point. The ironclads Carondelet, Commander Henry Walke; the Cincinnati, Commander Stembel, and the St. Louis, Lieutenant Commanding Leonard Paulding, were completed and put into commission a few days previous, making, with the Essex, four iron-clads, besides the wooden gun-boats Taylor, Lexington and Conestoga, now ready for offensive operations. O
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
berland rivers were opened to national vessels for hundreds of miles. Nashville, the capital of Tennessee and a place of great strategic importance, fell. Bowling Green had become untenable as soon as Donelson was attacked, and was abandoned on the 14th of February, the day before the Confederate works on the Cumberland were carried, while Columbus and the other end of the strategic line were evacuated early in March, thus leaving the Mississippi river free from the Confederate flag from St. Louis to Arkansas. The news of this victory was very encouraging to the Union people, especially when they beheld its results. When city after city fell and stronghold after stronghold was abandoned, and they saw that it was all in consequence of the capture of Fort Donelson, it is not strange that the national amazement and gratification knew no bounds, and it is only to be regretted that the Navy should not have had a greater share in the honors. Grant was made a Major-General, and we o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
een impossible for General Pope to have crossed over the river, for the purpose of attacking the Confederates in the rear at No. 10, while the gun and mortar-boats would make the attack in front. There has been an effective and harmonious co-operation between the land and naval forces, which has, under Providence, led to the glorious result of the fall of this stronghold, No. 10, with the garrison and munitions of war, and I regret to see in the dispatches of Major-General Halleck, from St. Louis, no reference is made to the capture of the forts, and the continuous shelling of the gun and mortar-boats, and the Navy's receiving the surrender of No. 10, when, in reality, it should be recorded as a historical fact that both services equally contributed to the victory — a bloodless victory — more creditable to humanity than if thousands had been slain. I also enclose reports from Lieutenants-Commanding Gwin and Shirk, of the gun-boats Taylor and Lexington, on the Tennessee, giving a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
secretary, had command of the forward battery, and his conduct met my entire approbation. A land force will be necessary to complete the destruction of this fort, which, if allowed to again be restored, would seriously interrupt the free navigation of the Lower Mississippi. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. D. Porter, Commodore, United States Navy. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. P. S.--In the various encounters I have had since leaving St. Louis on the last cruise (July 6), the Essex has been struck by heavy shot perceptibly one hundred and twenty-eight times — glancing shot have left no record; three have broken the iron, and but one through, and that at a distance of a few feet from the battery delivering it. W. D. P. United States Gun-Boat Anglo-American, Off Bayou Sara, Louisiana, Aug. 29, 1862. Sir — In pursuance of your order, I proceeded down stream on the 24th instant, for New Orleans, arriving there on the morni
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
at when the Army was operating in the interior of Tennessee, which seemed at that time the great battleground, the Navy could take advantage of the opportunity and make raids on the enemy along the Mississippi and its tributaries, keeping down guerillas, and enabling army transports to go and come without hindrance. In October, 1862, the guerillas were exceedingly troublesome all along the rivers, firing at every unarmed steamer which passed. Large quantities of goods were shipped from St. Louis to points along the river professedly Union, which ultimately reached the Confederates. All this was stopped, and the guerillas, when captured, were summarily dealt with, and the houses where they were harbored laid in ashes. No commerce was allowed on the Mississippi except with Memphis, and the river looked almost as deserted as in the early days of its discovery, its silence being seldom disturbed except by gun-boats and army transports, and the sharp report of the howitzers as they s
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
gers (1864). Steamer Fort Hindman.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. Pearce (1864). Steamer Winnebago.--Building at St. Louis (1864). Steamer Tensas (4th rate).--Acting-Ensign E. C. Van Pelt (1864-5). Steamer Gen. Pillow (4th rate).--Actinew Bryson (1865). Steamer Ozark.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant G. W. Brown (1865). Steamer Chickasaw.--Building at St. Louis (1864). Steamer Kickapoo.--Building at St. Louis 1864). Steamer Milwaukee.--Building at St. Louis (1864). SteaSt. Louis 1864). Steamer Milwaukee.--Building at St. Louis (1864). Steamer Tawah.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Jason Goudy (1864). Steamer Keywest.-Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant E. M. King (1864). Steamer Exchange.--While commanding Covington. See page 18.) *Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. S. Hurd (1864); Acting-VoSt. Louis (1864). Steamer Tawah.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Jason Goudy (1864). Steamer Keywest.-Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant E. M. King (1864). Steamer Exchange.--While commanding Covington. See page 18.) *Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. S. Hurd (1864); Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. C. Gipson (1865). Steamer Gazelle.--Acting-Ensign A. S. Palmer (1865). Steamer Avenger.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. A. Wright (1865). Steamer Elfin. Steamer Naiad.--Acting-Master Henry T. Keene (1865). Steame
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
nner 11,747 21 1,466 52 10,280 69 do Mar. 29, 1864 Pembina. Steamer Jeff Davis Waiting for prize lists of Benton, St. Louis, Louisville, Carondelet, Cairo. 500 00 47 45 452 55 Springfield   Benton, St. Louis, Louisville, Carondelet, Cairo SSt. Louis, Louisville, Carondelet, Cairo Steamer James Battle 240,895 62 17,651 16 223,244 46 Key West April 12, 1864 De Soto. Schooner John Scott 37,728 84 3,110 22 34,618 62 New Orleans April 23, 1864 Kennebec. Schooner J. T. Davis 9,925 00 1,465 04 8,459 96 do May 21, 1864 Cayuga. , T. A. Ward. Bark Meaco 92,213 47 Allowed to claimants.30,155 55 55,967 89 Philadelphia Mar. 11, 1863 Brooklyn, St. Louis. 6 090 02 Schooner Mabel 8,781 50 1,753 61 7,027 89 do Nov. 6, 1862 Dale, St. Lawrence. Schooner Morning Star 12, 1864 Circassian.   Money, $627 25 Waiting for prize list of the St. Louis. 627 25 76 22 551 03 Springfield   St. Louis. Schooner Martha Jane 21,130 14 2,022 26 19,107 88 Key West June 1, 1864 Fort Henry. Schooner Mary Douglas 4,865