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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 340 340 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 202 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 177 51 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 142 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 131 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 130 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 89 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 73 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) or search for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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the Beauregard family. At what time the particle de was abandoned and the hyphen resorted to instead, is not known. Jacques Toutant-Beauregard was the first of the name who came from France to Louisiana, under Louis XIV., as Commandant of a flotilla, the purpose of which was to bring assistance to the colony, and carry back timber for naval constructions. So thoroughly did he succeed in his enterprise in this connection that he was, on his return to France, decorated with the Cross of Saint Louis. He finally settled in Louisiana; and there married Miss Magdeleine Cartier. Three sons were born to them, one of whom, Louis Toutant-Beauregard, was, in his turn, united to Miss Victoire Ducros, the daughter of a respected planter of the parish of St. Bernard, near New Orleans, who had honorably filled several offices of trust under the French and Spanish governments of Louisiana. They had one daughter and two sons, the younger of whom, Jacques Toutant-Beauregard, married, in 1808, M
th his entire army, to crush General Grant before General Buell could give him assistance. . . . A variety of facts support the assumption that neither General Halleck, General Grant, nor the division commanders on the field beyond Pittsburg Landing, had the remotest expectation that the enemy would advance in offence from Corinth with full strength. General Halleck proposed to command the united armies in their advance upon Corinth, and yet he was not to leave his headquarters at St. Louis, Missouri, until the 7th. On the 5th, General Sherman, though not the senior division commander, yet virtually so, from the confidence reposed in him by General Grant, telegraphed to the latter: All is quiet along my lines now; the enemy has cavalry in our front, and I think there are two regiments and one battery six miles out. The Confederates were then within that distance with their whole army of nearly forty thousand men, and they formed their lines of battle that afternoon about a mil