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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 340 340 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 202 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 177 51 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 142 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 131 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 130 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 89 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 73 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) or search for St. Louis (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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n going on in all parts of the common country. But, should the new officers yield to such influences and manifest the same spirit which had caused many powerful States to deliberately violate the compact of the Union, and should the general government take any step to encroach upon the constitutional rights of the Southern States, then the State of Arkansas should place herself in the column with her sister States of the South, and share their destiny. Governor Rector was a native of St. Louis, Mo., where his father, Col. Elias Rector, had been formerly surveyor-general of the Territory of Missouri, which then included Arkansas. He removed to Arkansas before he arrived at maturity, for the care of landed interests which he had inherited from his father. He was descended, in part, from the Seviers, of Tennessee, and was a relative of Senator, and one time United States Minister, A. H. Sevier, of Arkansas. He resided at Little Rock, after holding several positions, as member of th
Hempstead, quartermaster; Elias B. Moore. of Fayetteville, commissary. The company organization after the election of Colonel Gratiot, who had been captain of Company A, was as follows, so far as is now recalled: Company A, Hempstead county, Capt. Daniel W. Jones; Company B, Washington county, Capt. S. K. Bell; Company C, Crawford county, Capt. T. B. Brown; Company E, Sebastian county, Capt. John Griffith; Company F, Crawford county, Capt. James Stuart. Colonel Gratiot, a native of St. Louis, Mo., and a graduate of the military academy at West Point, served during the Mexican war as lieutenant of artillery, and then, resigning his commission and studying law, settled at the town of Washington, Hempstead county, in 1848, but did not enter actively in the practice of the profession His sister, wife of Bernard Hempstead, resided there. The family was of French extraction. On the call for troops to resist invasion he offered his services, which were gladly accepted, and he was su
lry. Felix N. Littlejohn, Paris, Tex., assistant surgeon Martin's Fifth Texas rangers. July, 1863, the board returned to Little Rock: John R. Pickett, Jacksonport, Ark., assistant surgeon Stand Watie's Cherokees. Thomas A. Lornagin, St. Louis, Mo., surgeon Lewis' Seventh Missouri infantry. George G. Duggans, Cambridge, Mo., assistant surgeon Scanland's Texas squadron. August, 1863: John F. Locke, St. Joseph, Mo., assistant surgeon Mitchell's Missouri infantry. Willis R. Jones, Arkad assistant surgeon Smith's Third Missouri cavalry. January, 1864, at Washington, Ark.: Marshall A. Brown, Miami, Mo., surgeon Clark's Missouri infantry. John M. Welborn, Walnut Hill, Ark., assistant surgeon Camden hospital. Robert Duncan, St. Louis, Mo., Gaither's Arkansas infantry. Johnson J. Whitmore, Centre Point, Ark., assistant surgeon Hill's Arkansas cavalry. John M. Frazier, Missouri, assistant surgeon Burns' Eleventh Missouri infantry. February, 1864: John H. McMurray, Independenc
fteenth, Sixteenth and Twenty-third Arkansas regiments, and First Arkansas battalion, as well as several Mississippi and Alabama regiments, and Louisiana artillery. His Arkansas troops lost 225 in killed, wounded and missing during the long siege, which was only terminated when they were forced to surrender by the capitulation of Vicksburg. On July 9th the post was surrendered, and the men were then paroled, and some of them were never exchanged. After the war General Beall resided in St. Louis, Mo., and engaged in business as a general commission merchant. He died on the 26th of July, 1883, at McMinnville, Tenn. Brigadier-General William L. Cabell Brigadier-General William L. Cabell was born in Danville, Va., January 1, 1827, the third child of Gen. Benjamin W. S. and Sarah Eppes Cabell, who lived to see seven sons and two daughters grown. Six sons held prominent positions in the Confederate army. The other, Dr. Powhatan Cabell, died from the effect of an arrow wound recei