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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
rook's command and three brigades under my command, at a place called the Quaker Meeting-House, he ascertained that General Early was in town with Stonewall Jackson's old corps. This was enough for him. That night he began a rapid retreat toward Salem, leaving his cavalry to make demonstrations on Early's lines long enough to give him a good day's start. He thus made his escape with little loss-the heaviest of it consisting of some ten or twelve field-guns that fell into our hands near Salem.Salem. He escaped through the mountains into West Virginia, and reached the Ohio by way of the Kanawha Valley. If he had been attacked the evening of the affair at the Quaker Meeting-House, or had been vigorously pursued early next morning, I think the probabilities are that his entire army would have been captured. They were weary from long marching, and, from all accounts, greatly demoralized after the retreat began. Indeed, it was currently reported, and generally believed on our side, that H
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid. (search)
o rather abrupt hills, had erected a long barricade of timber, from which they opened a brisk fire upon the head of the column. The advance guard charged this work on horseback, and as it was too high for the horses to leap, and too strong to be broken down by their rush, some sixteen or eighteen men were unnecessarily lost. A demonstration up]on the flank, however, quickly dislodged the party, and we entered the town without further molestation. On the following day, before we reached Salem, we found parties of militia thick along the road, and at that place several hundred were collected, while squads were rapidly coming in from all directions. To attack instantly was the only policy proper with these fellows, for although they were raw and imperfectly armed, they would fight, and if we had hesitated in the least, might have become dangerous. The Second Regiment, dashing at full speed into the town, dispersed this body with trifling loss on either side. I have seen the
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
w. He was a man of intuitive military perception; his judgment was never surpassed. At The Plains, a village on the Manassas Railroad, about four miles east of Salem, Lieutenant A. D. Payne, with thirty men, was sent back to guide and accompany General Lee, who was with Longstreet's Corps, while Captain Randolph, with the rest he lieutenant retraced his steps, and reported to General Lee as he was crossing the Rappahannock at Hinson's mill. The troops were hurried on in the direction of Salem, the track over which Jackson had just passed, and encamped for the night between that point and Orlean. General Lee made his headquarters at Prospect Hill, the sly, the enemy were not apprised of the General's exposed position, and the night passed without alarm. The next day, just before the head of the column arrived at Salem, information was brought to General Lee that a body of the enemy's cavalry were approaching that place. Lieutenant Payne, with his small detachment, was thrown fo