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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ng the rear-guard under Averell and driving it through Liberty in the afternoon. Hunter reached Salem on the 21st, and here adopted a line of retreat as injudicious as had been his line of advance oley Bridge, June 27, with his army in a state of demoralization and exhaustion. Early reached Salem on the 22d. He had moved 209 miles in nine days, had saved Lynchburg and driven Hunter headlony a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving oops sent by Grant could arrive. Early's forces after their severe march of near 300 miles from Salem were greatly worn, and probably did not number 10,000 men in front of Washington. It was never mparable with that of Stonewall Jackson—which carried 15,000 men, in less than three weeks, from Salem to the suburbs of Washington and spread consternation in the North; to the skill which extricate
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
ng the rear-guard under Averell and driving it through Liberty in the afternoon. Hunter reached Salem on the 21st, and here adopted a line of retreat as injudicious as had been his line of advance oley Bridge, June 27, with his army in a state of demoralization and exhaustion. Early reached Salem on the 22d. He had moved 209 miles in nine days, had saved Lynchburg and driven Hunter headlony a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving oops sent by Grant could arrive. Early's forces after their severe march of near 300 miles from Salem were greatly worn, and probably did not number 10,000 men in front of Washington. It was never mparable with that of Stonewall Jackson—which carried 15,000 men, in less than three weeks, from Salem to the suburbs of Washington and spread consternation in the North; to the skill which extricate
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 54 (search)
ite you such a letter as our long silence should lead you to expect. Upon the very day I wrote to you last, our brigade, with General F. Lee's and Hampton's, started from Lovdon in a southerly direction, encamping at night, for a few hours, near Salem, in Fauquier. This move, considering the direction our army was marching, filled us all with astonishment, and was one, the mystery of which, none of us could understand. The fact that General Stuart headed the expedition led many of us to believe that our journey southward would not continue long. Leaving Salem at 3 o'clock A. M., Thursday morning, June ——, we moved against Thoroughfare Gap, and crossing the rugged mountains, attacked a wagon train, but did nothing more than throw some shells in among them. That night was rainy and disagreeable, and we spent it without shelters or fires. Next day we moved to attack the Yankees at Bristoe Station, but they had fled before we got there. Continuing the march that day, we halted