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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 98 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 82 10 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 69 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 58 8 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 40 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 32 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for San Antonio (Texas, United States) or search for San Antonio (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
the places at which they were to be found. Hence the various temporary ordnance works grew up about existing foundries, machine shops, railroad repair shops, etc., and at the few small U. S. arsenals and ordnance depots. The chief of these in the early part of the war were at Richmond, Va., Fayetteville, N. C., Charleston, S. C., Augusta, Savannah and Macon, Ga., Nashville and Memphis, Tenn., Mount Vernon and Montgomery, Ala., New Orleans and Baton Rouge, La., Little Rock, Ark., and San Antonio, Tex. The events of the war before long compelled the abandonment of some of these, New Orleans and Nashville being the most important, and from time to time others were added to the list, as, for instance, Columbia, S. C., Atlanta and Columbus, Ga., Selma, Ala., and Jackson, Miss. Of these latter places Atlanta and Selma became most important. At these various places different lines of work were specially pushed as local facilities made feasible. Heavy artillery was at first turned out o