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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ifting sand on Tybee island. The people of Savannah, familiar with the situation, thought they wernor Brown, being advised of the situation at Savannah, and of the probability that Pulaski and Jackg the First volunteer regiment of Georgia, at Savannah, which opens with these words, deserving quotiastic rivalry among the militia companies at Savannah for the honor of this service. Colonel Lawtocelebrated with great fervor by the people of Savannah, and public meetings held at various other pl with my knowledge of large reinforcements at Savannah and Atlanta ready to come up by rail at a momd out of the State by water, to New York, via Savannah. Joseph E. Brown, Governor and Commander-r two later, Col. A. R. Lawton, in command at Savannah, under instructions from the governor demande notified, informally, that Forts Pulaski and Jackson had been occupied by the troops of the State journment on January 29th to meet in March at Savannah, authorized the equipment of two regiments, t[8 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
part of 1862, the whole battalion was sent to Savannah. The Oglethorpes were then detached, and wit and the Sixty-third regiment were on duty at Savannah as infantry and heavy artillery—detachments fthe war, composed of the militia companies of Savannah, and commanded by Col. A. R. Lawton. On the oughout the war. This regiment was on duty at Savannah and Fort Pulaski when Ramsey's regiment was oy battery of Columbus, the Chatham battery of Savannah, and a large number of unassigned companies. ut never give up the fight. His company left Savannah May 21st, and subsequently was assigned to thwton was put in command, with headquarters at Savannah, and three days later he was notified that thevaded the blockaders and entered the port of Savannah in safety, bringing 10,000 Enfield rifles, 1,hville, at St. George, brought them safely to Savannah about the middle of November without getting mmand December 28, 1861, with headquarters at Savannah. General Jackson advised General Lee that he[8 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
Indiana regiment at that place. The latter retreated, abandoning camp and supplies and losing some 30 prisoners. The Georgians pursued along the sand until the Federal forces made a junction. During this advance Wright's command was somewhat annoyed by the firing of the Federal steamer Monticello, but sustained no loss. This exploit of the Georgians was the only episode during 1861, in North Carolina, which resulted in advantage to the Confederate arms. In December the Third was sent to Savannah. The Georgia volunteers who arrived at Pensacola, Fla., in the spring of 1861, found the city and navy yard in the hands of a small force under General Bragg. These Georgia commands were Ramsey's First Georgia regiment, Villepigue's First Georgia battalion, Capt. Isadore P. Girardey's Washington artillery from Augusta, and the Fifth Georgia regiment. After being in camp and on duty near Fort Barrancas for six weeks the First Georgia, about the 1st of June, was ordered to Virginia. The
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
s headquarters at Coosawhatchie, and later at Savannah, was making efforts to obtain reinforcements lt to maintain, and forward the heavy guns to Savannah. It appeared that there were now no inhabitae had moved the guns and was shipping them to Savannah and Fernandina. The Fourth Georgia battalionated with him. He declared that the attack on Savannah must be repelled at any cost, and intimated t Augusta in the contingency of the capture of Savannah was felt, and General Lee authorized the obstd, and Captain Blain's company was ordered to Savannah. The military situation had now become ver the governor's speech to the State troops at Savannah March 15th, to which General Wayne added, thae next two or three months for the defense of Savannah. My own opinion is, said General Pemberton, ter the flag was lowered, carried the news to Savannah. At the close of the fight all the parapet Gen. T. F. Drayton's district, next north of Savannah, and was in action with the enemy on March 20[10 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
the Confederate steamer General Lee came down from Savannah under flag of truce, carrying a lady and her son w following day the boat and crew were sent back to Savannah, with a message from Hunter that the presence of t the armed cruiser Nashville ran the blockade into Savannah with a cargo of arms. This vessel was the first coff in boats and made their escape up the river to Savannah, though pursued for some distance by boats from Fory Georgia was constructed, to which the ladies of Savannah made large contributions. The Fingal, whose lengtr, and brought several monitors to the vicinity of Savannah. During the fall of 1862 only a small force was lhe Georgia troops to occasionally skirmish between Savannah and Port Royal. Notable among these encounters wa to General Mercer to finish the fortifications at Savannah. The governor's message in November described t city. It was further patriotically resolved that Savannah should never be surrendered, but defended, street
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
Ridge, in the Atlanta campaign; then went to Savannah in Hardee's command. In the spring of 1865 ied at Jacksboro, Tenn.), and being ordered to Savannah was united with the Thirteenth infantry (Phoeampaign of 1864, especially in the defense of Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea. The Firce of this regiment was chiefly in defense of Savannah in the latter part of 1864. The Fifth Geor Appomattox. A part of this battalion was at Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea and the siethe Georgia coast; assisted in the defense of Savannah in December, 1864; also served for a time in eneral Hardee attempted to defend the city of Savannah in December, 1864. The Thompson Artillery,ast, and was engaged in the operations around Savannah in December, 1864. The Macon Light Artillergia coast and participated in the defense of Savannah under Hardee in December, 1864. The same is son disabled by a wound. During the siege of Savannah in December, 1864, this regiment, commanded b[9 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
brigade consisting of six regiments, Thirteenth, Col. Marcellus Douglass; Twenty-sixth, Col. E. N. Atkinson; Thirty-first, Col. C. A. Evans; Thirty-eighth, Col. Augustus R. Wright; Sixtieth, Col. W. H. Stiles; Sixty-first, Col. John H. Lamar, arrived in Virginia. These regiments had been serving on the Georgia coast under General Lawton since the fall of 1861, and some of the troops, especially of the Thirteenth regiment, had been engaged in two spirited affairs on Whitemarsh island, below Savannah, in March and April, 1862. On the 11th of June, Gen. R. E. Lee, who had succeeded J. E. Johnston, wrote to Jackson: The practicability of reinforcing you has been the subject of earnest consideration. It has been determined to do so at the expense of weakening this army. Brigadier-General Lawton with six regiments from Georgia is on the way to you, and Brigadier-General Whiting with eight veteran regiments leaves here today. The object is to enable you to crush the forces opposed
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
truction of the Nashville organization on the coast in March the defenses of Savannah loss of the Atlanta Streight's raid and capture distress in the State. the pattern of the Monitor, and one of these, the Montauk, was sent down below Savannah by Admiral Dupont for a trial of its effectiveness against Fort McAllister. Tnstructed by Confederate engineers on Genesis point, guarded the approaches to Savannah by the Ogeechee river, and was in charge of Maj. John B. Gallie, supported by itting out in the North for invasion of the South by sea. Either Charleston or Savannah, and more probably both, was to be the object of this expedition. On February, Col. G. A. Gordon; First battalion sharpshooters, Capt. A. Shaaff; battalion Savannah volunteer guard, Maj. John Screven; Emmet rifles, Capt. George W. Anderson; Fonforcements might be hoped in emergency, were about 17,000. The defenses of Savannah at this time were quite elaborate and extensive, but were weak in the guns of
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
judgment that all other operations must be subordinated to the defense of Atlanta against Grant, holding such places as Richmond, Weldon, Wilmington, Charleston, Savannah, etc., merely as fortified posts with garrisons strong enough to hold out until they could be relieved after Grant had been cared for. Twenty thousand men shouldo regiments of Georgia State troops were organized with E. M. Galt as colonel of the First, and R. L. Storey of the Second. These were on duty at Charleston and Savannah, and late in the year on the State railroad, guarding bridges. Several more regi. ments had been completed for the Confederate service: The Sixtieth, Col. Wilb, promoted to major-general with headquarters at Atlanta, and under him were Brig.-Gens. Alfred Iverson, Jr., with headquarters at Rome, and Henry R. Jackson at Savannah. Maj.-Gen. Gustavus W. Smith, who had resigned from the Confederate army, entered the service of the State with especial charge, at this time, of fortifications
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
Chapter 15: The campaigns of 1864 battle of Olustee operations near Savannah the Wilderness to Cold Harbor Georgia troops engaged Early's valley campaign. The first conflict to which Georgia troops were called outside the State er Pierce, Bonaud's battalion. During these operations in Florida a demonstration was made on Whitemarsh island, near Savannah, by a considerable Federal force, which landed on the morning of February 22d. The enemy was repulsed after a brisk skier and Turner, and a section of Maxwell's battery under Lieutenant Richardson. The Confederate naval forces afloat at Savannah during 1864 were under the command of Capt. W. W. Hunter, a native of Philadelphia, who had espoused the cause of the Softy-sixth regiment was ordered up from Macon, and the Twelfth battalion and Forty-seventh and Fifty-fifth regiments from Savannah. Colquitt's Georgia brigade and Ransom's North Carolina brigade formed a division under General Colquitt, in Beauregard
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