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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. Report of its Operations, April 3-6, 1865, when it was captured with Lee's Division at Sailor's Creek. This, printed from the original manuscript, was recently supplied by General G. W. Custis Lee, late President Washington and Lee University: Savannah, March 3, 1866. Major-General G. W. C. Lee, Commanding Lee's Division, Well's Corps, Army, Northern Virginia. General: In compliance with your request that I would communicate in an official form such information as I may possess of the operations of Crutchfield's Brigade, from the evacuation of the lines on the north of the James river to the capture of the Division at Sailors' Creek, on the 6th April, 1865, I have the honor to report as follows: The Brigade consisted of the 10th, 18th, 19th and 20th Virginia Battalions of artillery, the Chaffin's Bluff garrison composed of five unattached Virginia companies of artillery, temporarily organized as a battalion, and the 18th Georgia ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
tion to accompany Colonel Biffle with his regiment of cavalry to Tennessee. We left and made forced marches day and night, recrossed the mountains, and crossed the Tennessee river at Decatur and went down on the northeast side of the river. At Savannah I stopped and camped in the Fair Grounds with my section, and Colonel Biffle went on to the village and became engaged with a command of the Yankees on the opposite side of the river. After considerable firing, and he being unable to dislodge tff, the cavalrymen procured a batteau from the opposite side of the river and went over and got all their horses and equipments and provisions, among which was a nice lot of hams, of which Colonel Biffle sent me a liberal share. After leaving Savannah (where poor Coon Herndon of Ferrell's battery had been mortally wounded on a former occasion) we went down the river on a still hunt for gunboats. We did not find any boats, but we did come across a nice party of Yankees on the opposite side of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
usta, without rest, they rushed to Green's Cut, to meet Kilpatrick's raid, who was then threatening Waynesboro, where Wheeler met and defeated him. Defence of Savannah. Two hundred and fifty of Young's men were there mounted, and under Captain Eve were marched hastily to Pocotaligo, and from Pocotoligo to Tullifini, Coosawhaommand of that hard old fighter, the gallant Major Puckett, was heard in nearly all of the bloody and obstinate fighting along the rice dams, during the seige of Savannah. A complimentary order from Lieutenant-General Hardee but for the gallant conduct of General Young's command, I could not have held Savannah so long—was read bySavannah so long—was read by Adjutant—General Church before us at Heyward's Farm, soon after the evacuation. He was without a peer as a cavalry officer from Georgia, and was one of Stuart's as well as Hampton's, most trusted lieutenants. That the choice should have fallen upon him, demonstrates what the War Department, General Lee, aye, President Davis, th<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
l's Tavern with Rodes' troops, and both divisions. fought with mixed ranks until dark. These extracts are from General Fitzhugh Lee's life of General Lee, in which he gives a graphic and picturesque account of this great event, which rounded out and finished the career of Stonewall Jackson. Colston was, on duty, possibly a little impetuous. After the death of Jackson, General Colston was ordered to report to General Beaureguard, and was placed in command of a brigade of Georgians at Savannah, and also in command of the defences of St. Augustine river. He was appreciated as a scientific soldier. In the spring of 1864, when General Butler landed at City Point and threatened Petersburg, General Colston was ordered to Petersburg, where he remained in command of the lines south of the Appomattox until General Lee came with the Army of Northern Virginia. During that period General Colston kept the enemy at bay, and repelled several assaults upon our lines; in one of which his h