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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 283 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 274 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 168 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 147 55 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 94 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 76 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 66 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) or search for Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
ur shattered ranks and try to crush us. I sent my staff officers to the rear to assist in rallying the troops, and hurried to our line of batteries, as the only support that I could give them, knowing that my presence would impress upon every one of them the necessity of holding the ground to the last extremity. I knew if the army was to be saved, those batteries must check the enemy. As I rode along the line of artillery, I observed my old friend Captain Miller, Washington Artillery, of Sharpsburg record, walking between his guns and smoking his pipe as quietly and contentedly as he could at his camp-fire. The enemy's skirmishers were then advancing and threatening assault. For unaccountable reasons, the enemy did not pursue his advantage. Our army was soon in compact shape, and its face turned once more toward Virginia. I may mention here that it has been absurdly said that General Lee ordered me to put Hood's and McLaws' Divisions in support of Pickett's assault. General Lee
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
r place he employed the pen of Lieutenant A. D. Payne to copy his order of assault to be delivered to his officers-orders which were never acted on, as the place was surrendered before the assaulting columns began their work. The General remained at Harper's Ferry till a late hour of the night, disposing of the prisoners and the material of war which he had captured. He then started, escorted by Lieutenant Payne, with a detachment of twenty of his command, to reach Lee's headquarters at Sharpsburg, leaving his army to follow. At daybreak, a little out of the town, the party halted, and built a fire in a skirt of woods. Here Jackson slept while a party was sent to discover the position of Lee's headquarters. As soon as this fact was reported to him he joined the general commanding. The next day the battle of Sharpsburg was fought, during which the Black Horse acted as aides and couriers. In Jackson's report of this campaign he extols the conduct of this command, naming and compl
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Stuart in camp and field. (search)
eral Lee's army. When the Confederate forces advanced northward in the summer of 1862, Stuart's cavalry accompanied the column, and took part in all the important operations of that year — on the Rapidan, the Rappahannock, the Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, and Fredericksburg. In these bustling scenes Stuart acted with immense energy and enthusiasm, laying broad and deep his reputation as a cavalry officer. By incessant fighting, and an ardor and activity which seemed to pass all bounds, he han. At the battle of Fredericksburg, in the preceding December, the same masterly handling of his guns had protected Jackson's right toward the Massaponnax, which was the real key of the battle; and in these two great actions, as on the left at Sharpsburg, Stuart exhibited a genius for the management of artillery which would have delighted Napoleon. In the operations of 1863, culminating at Gettysburg, he was charged with misconception or disobedience of orders in separating himself from the ma
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
-into the fortifications on the Potomac. A new chapter in the war was about to be written in letters of blood. The Sharpsburg campaign was now opened by the advance of Jackson into Maryland. Later, when that officer recrossed into Virginia, to own. After the surrender Hill was left to dispose of the prisoners and captured stores, while Jackson hastened back to Sharpsburg, where Lee, with Longstreet and D. 11. Hill, was beset by McClellan's entire army. He arrived, not a moment too soon the Old Guard, with Ney for a leader, and under the eye of Napoleon, ended McClellan's efforts to break Lee's lines at Sharpsburg. On the retreat from Maryland, Hill brought up the rear, and at Shepherdstown inflicted upon the enemy, in repulse of Light Division was either in the van as charging column, or came later into action as the well-chosen forlorn hope. At Sharpsburg, in the gathering dusk of a doubtful field-when the left wing was barely standing, the centre hardly resistant, the rig