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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 283 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 274 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 168 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 147 55 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 94 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 76 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 66 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) or search for Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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ecessary. Harper's Ferry had surrendered. On September 17th the armies met face to face at Sharpsburg, where Jackson, having left A. P. Hill attending to certain details of the bloodless surrenderrow. The First brigade, under Gen. Harry T. Hays, who had joined it on the 15th, marched to Sharpsburg with Ewell's division, under Lawton; the Second brigade, under General Starke, with the Stonerliest participants in the battle were the Washington artillery, posted on a line just east of Sharpsburg, fronting the Antietam. During the afternoon of the 15th the Federal batteries appeared on thre the only ones of the battalion engaged. Down in front and to the right of the battalion at Sharpsburg was the bridge to be known as Burnside's, guarded by Toombs, and there Richardson, with two Naults; and two of the guns, with Garnett's brigade, drove the enemy from a ridge to the left of Sharpsburg. Captain Moody, Lieut. J. Sillers, Sergeants Conroy and Price, and Corporals Gaulin and Donoh
4: The battle panorama at Fredericksburg the Louisiana artillery at Marye's Hill fright Ful slaughter of the enemy battle of Chancellorsville Louisianians fight again at Marye's Hill Nicholls' brigade with Jack son. Lee at Sharpsburg, September 18th, stood prepared to renew the conflict on the ground of the 17th; but McClellan was not so ready. He was satisfied to see from a signal station perched on the top of a high mountain what was passing within our lines. At dark onbugles rang as cheerily again in Virginia as on that day when they had summoned it to new and gayer fields across the border. The Confederate army was safely gathered back into Virginia and marshalled to fight the great battle which followed Sharpsburg. No battle in our civil war was more clearly a defeat of the Federals than the battle at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. McClellan had begun a new forward movement, promising activity, but did not long continue it. Shortly after his retur
ness and the absence of horses. Lieut. Frank McElroy, of the Third company, was as quick as a flash from his guns. His practice throughout with artillery-infantry was excellent. Three times did McElroy, with his small garrison, repulse as many attacks; three times his bullets from brigade rifles whizzed around the advancing Federals, decimating them. They fell before McElroy's shells and Harris' rifles, covering the field before Fort Gregg with dead bodies. One-half of the Washington artillery drivers were armed with muskets and placed on duty in the forlorn hope of Fort Gregg. Under Lieutenant McElroy's able and courageous management these drivers did gallant service. On this terrible day Capt. Andrew Hero, Jr., was wounded at Petersburg, as he had been severely wounded at Sharpsburg. As sergeant, lieutenant and captain, Hero was a true soldier. His name was one particularly hard for a soldier to bear. Smiles were easy, but the smile never came when Hero was at the gun.
on at Cedar Run or Slaughter's mountain, and in the Second Manassas campaign he was again called on to command the brigade when General Starke took command of the division on the 28th of August. In the desperate fighting at the railroad cut he and his men were conspicuous. After the capture of Harper's Ferry, he went into the battle of Sharpsburg, and won new honors by his coolness and intrepidity in that great struggle. Though wounded in the foot, he was soon again in the fight. After Sharpsburg his regiment was transferred to the brigade of General Hays, with which it participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Winchester and Gettysburg. In the latter battle he gained the plaudits of his commanding officers by conspicuous gallantry. Early in October he was promoted to brigadier-general and assigned again to command of the Second Louisiana brigade, in the Stonewall division. He commanded this brigade in a gallant action during the Mine Run campaign, fall of