hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Field letters from Headquarters Second corps A. N. V. (search)
orce. Rodes is in position. They are advancing through Manassas Gap, along the railroad, to get at the pontoon bridges. By what time can you be up? If you can't cross tonight the bridge will be taken up and sent back by way of Cedarville to Strasburg, to go with you, and be put down above where you cross the river. Send me word by courier — to ride rapidly — by what hour you will be here or whether you go by Strasburg. I am, General, yours, &c., (Signed) A. S. Pendleton, A. A. G. Strasburg. I am, General, yours, &c., (Signed) A. S. Pendleton, A. A. G. General Early. I will send another courier in an hour. Headquarters Second army corps, August 1, 1863. General,--Lieutenant-General Ewell directs me to send the following extract from a letter just received from General Lee, and to request that you examine the ground referred to and report as soon as possible: The engineers report a good line for us to take about one and a half miles from Orange Courthouse, in the direction of the Rapidan, on the hills ranging between the headwaters of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
, and the next day mustered in the other six companies into the service of the Confederate States. As soon as the battalion was mustered in, Mrs. Bradley T. Johnson, under escort of Captain Nicholas, and Second-Lieutenant Shearer, Company A, started for North Carolina to endeavor to procure arms and equipments for it. Proceeding to Leesburg, it was found impossible to go farther, as the enemy had that day taken possession of Alexandria. Returning, she then went by way of Winchester and Strasburg to Richmond and Raleigh. She at once made an appeal to Governor Ellis, as representing her native State, who, after five minutes explanation, gave her rifles and accoutrements for five hundred men. Not satisfied with this, the convention of North Carolina, then in session, contributed a large sum of money, which was further increased by citizens of Raleigh and Petersburg. Bringing with her the arms from North Carolina, in Richmond she called on Governor Letcher, who promptly furnished he