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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 20 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 19 19 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 9 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. You can also browse the collection for Taunton (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Taunton (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Francis J. Child (search)
erseded nor excelled. He was the first to arouse English scholars to the importance of this, as may be read in the dedication of a partial edition taken from the Percy manuscripts and published in London in 1861. He recognized in them the true foundation of the finest literature of the modern world, and he considered them so much the better from the fact that they were not composed to be printed, but to be recited or sung. Matthew Arnold wrote in a letter from America: After lecturing at Taunton, I came to Boston with Professor Child of Harvard, a very pleasant man, who is a great authority on ballad poetry, very warm praise, considering the source whence it came. Late in life Professor Child edited separate versions in modern English of some curious old ballads, and sent them as Christmas presents to his friends. It is not surprising that he should have been interested as well in the rude songs of the British sailors, which he heard on crossing the ocean. He was mightily amus