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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 68 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 65 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 62 4 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 40 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) or search for Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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e enemy's skirmishers who obstinately contended for the low ground lying north-east of the hills we had carried. Through this low ground, indeed, a rude continuation of the line of rifle-pits upon the hill extended to a lithe stream called Citico Creek. Sheridan had also moved up on the right of General Wood, driving the rebel pickets before him and occupied that portion of their first line which lay in front of his division. At three o'clock, General Howard's corps was put in motion. Wheeling to the left, it passed Fort Wood, between that work and the railroad, and took position upon the left of General Granger's corps, (Wood and Sheridan;) and while Carl Schurz's division relieved Sam Beatty, Steinwehr's halted in the open ground and waited for orders. At this point, I, with hundreds of others, was gazing upon the spectacle below from the battlements of Fort Wood. Generals Thomas, Granger, and Reynolds were there, watching every movement of the troops, with looks of intellig
and used with distinguished consideration. The private thieves are sure of the, treatment of honorable enemies and prisoners taken in battle. Several hundred of this last marauding gang are now in the confederate prisons at Richmond. They are not chained up in a penitentiary for felons, not handed over to be dealt with by the outraged laws of Virginia. Why not? Perhaps this State government at Richmond is not the true government of Virginia; perhaps the true government is the one at Wheeling, or at Alexandria, or at Norfolk, and these raiders and robbers have committed no offence against that government or against the people of the real State of Virginia--that is, the loyal State. This is the theory at Washington; those in rebellion have no rights; and to do by those caitiffs as was done by Morgan, in Ohio, would not there be regarded. as the legitimate retaliation of belligerents, but as a new outrage by rebels; and, doubtless, if the wretches were hanged, an equal number of