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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 68 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 65 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 62 4 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 40 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) or search for Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

ention of disaffected counties, to be held at Wheeling on May 13th. These proceedings attracted tern border and Pennsylvania on the northern. Wheeling, the city chosen as the place where the convected Maj. A. Loring, commanding volunteers at Wheeling on April 29, 1861, to accept and muster into nted to meet delegates from other counties at Wheeling, May 13th, to determine what course should bellan with his army had entered the State, and Wheeling and the country far beyond were occupied by Oty counties were represented by delegates at Wheeling, June 11th, and the members before proceeding brothers. On June 20th, the convention at Wheeling elected a provisional governor, Francis H. Pived. A legislature was elected, which met at Wheeling, July 2d, and was called the legislature of tchange bank at Weston was seized and taken to Wheeling. A resolution favoring the division of the Sealth. The constitutional convention met at Wheeling, November 26, 1861, and, influenced more by t[1 more...]
two days before, to Richmond, to report the condition of the little force, half armed and altogether undisciplined, which was attempting to hold the important post of Grafton, the junction of the roads connecting Washington with Parkersburg and Wheeling and thence with the Western States. In response to this appeal General Lee could only say that he would furnish some arms at Staunton, Va., and give Heck authority to recruit a regiment in the valley and mountain counties on the road to Grafton He pledged a religious respect for property rights, and not only non-interference with slaves, but an iron hand to crush any servile insurrection. On the same date he ordered Col. B. F. Kelley, commanding the First Virginia infantry (U. S.) at Wheeling, to move toward Fairmount, supported by the Sixteenth Ohio from Bellaire, while the Fourteenth and Eighteenth Ohio, and a battery, were sent toward Grafton from Parkersburg. The troops from the northwest promptly repaired the bridges en route a
military operations again, after the winter of 1861-62, General Rosecrans was sent to the West, and the general command of the Federals in West Virginia, now called the Mountain department, was given to Gen. John C. Fremont, with headquarters at Wheeling. On the Confederate side there was considerable activity in March on the border. General Johnson had reoccupied Huntersville, and at Camp Alleghany and other posts had a force of about 3,000 men present. Among his soldiers were the Thirty-firo remain at home as quiet citizens in obedience to the laws of the land, and to all such, clemency and amnesty are declared; but those who persist in adhering to the cause of the public enemy and the pretended State government he has erected at Wheeling, will be dealt with as their obstinate treachery deserves. He appealed to all able-bodied citizens to join the army to defend the sanctities of religion and virtue, home territory, honor and law, and declared that the oaths imposed by the in
iend C. Cox, who became a staff officer with Gen. W. H. F. Lee; and Robert McEldowney, a member of the Shriver Grays, of Wheeling. The Shriver Grays, organized at Wheeling, with about 80 men, was organized in May, 1861, with Daniel Shriver, captaiWheeling, with about 80 men, was organized in May, 1861, with Daniel Shriver, captain; John W. Mitchell, first lieutenant; John B. Leadley, second lieutenant; Pryor Boyd, junior second lieutenant. The company left Wheeling on the 21st or 22d of May, 1861, and went to Harper's Ferry, reporting to Col. T. J. Jackson. It was musteredWheeling on the 21st or 22d of May, 1861, and went to Harper's Ferry, reporting to Col. T. J. Jackson. It was mustered in as Company G, Twenty-seventh Virginia infantry, of the Stonewall brigade. It served faithfully in that regiment until about May, 1863, when most of the survivors of the original company were transferred to the Thirty-sixth Virginia cavalry battalion, commanded by Maj. James Sweeney, of Wheeling. The battalion participated in the East Tennessee campaign as a part of Longstreet's command, was at the burning of Chambersburg, and in the rear guard after Gettysburg. Captain Shriver was succeed
onfederate commander of his danger. While the captain was absent on this duty, a detachment under Lieutenants McNeill and Dolan remained near Moorefield, severely punished a raiding party sent against them in June, and about the 18th attacked their mortal enemies, the Swamp Dragons, who were escorting a train of provisions furnished them by the Federals. The fight that resulted was a hot one, and Lieutenant Dolan was mortally wounded. This officer was a native of Ireland and a citizen of Wheeling, and a man of remarkable bravery. The old captain now rejoined his men, and a few weeks later they rode into a camp of 300 Federals at Springfield, and captured 80 prisoners and 145 horses. He had with him 70 men. He learned from his prisoners that they were a part of a picked body sent out by General Kelley against McNeill, with orders to kill, capture or drive him from the valley. The horses taken enabled him to remount not only his own men but a company of Missourians under Captain Wo