Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) or search for Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
ots and the ports of the Confederacy. Charleston, S. C., and Wilmington, N. C., the two most closely guarded ports, continued to be made by ely gotten by the Federal vessels lying off the harbor of Wilmington, North Carolina, and was dancing gleefully on her way with a bountiful catant forts below New Orleans, at Mobile, Pensacola, Savannah, and Wilmington. There were at the Northern posts, which might, of course, have during the last two months of 1864, the imports of Charleston and Wilmington comprised over eight million five hundred thousand pounds of meatrleans had, of course, long before been lost, as also Pensacola. Wilmington, so long closely watched, finally fell after the capture of Fort of hostilities Fort Fisher had kept open the approach to Wilmington, North Carolina, and even at the beginning of 1865 the blockade-runners wat naught the efforts of the Federal squadron to keep them out of Wilmington. The fall of Fort Fisher, making the blockade at last a complete
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
ow water, where the gunboats could not follow and where her valuable cargo could be secured by the Confederates. A single cargo at war-time prices was enough to pay more than the cost of the vessel. Regular auctions were held in Charleston or Wilmington, where prices for goods not needed by the Confederate Government were run up to fabulous figures. The business of blockade-running was well organized abroad, especially in England. One successful trip was enough to start the enterprise with adered as much to Farragut and to Porter as to Grant. Sherman's march to the sea would never have been undertaken had not the Federal fleets already held possession of Port Royal and so strongly invested the harbors of Savannah, Charleston, and Wilmington. In his campaign against Richmond, McClellan sought shelter under the guns of the navy, and Grant was enabled, through the navy's control of the coast, to maintain his base at City Point. Had Jefferson Davis a navy at his command, the resul
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
has put it, General Sherman took the city by turning his back on it. The harbor of Wilmington, North Carolina, had two entrances available for vessels of not more than twelve feet draft, and thererly return of the fleet. The supporting army was withdrawn to a point sixteen miles north of Wilmington. No lookout was kept up the coast, and, in consequence, the first tidings of the return were d the blockading fleet covering the approach and departure of blockade-runners to and from Wilmington, N. C. Only after two powerful expeditions had been sent against it did the Federals finally gain navigation along the coast, but it was of the utmost importance that vessels with cargoes for Wilmington should be able to make port and discharge their precious ballast in the form of munitions of wouth of the Cape Fear River, North Carolina, would have to be reduced if blockade-running into Wilmington was to be broken up. The first attack on Fort Fisher, December 24-25, 1864, was unsuccessful,
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
-directed shot from the monitor's 15-inch gun struck the Nashville fair amidships, and in a few minutes she burst into flame, and blew up. The Confederate ram Atlanta, on the 17th of June, 1863, running down into Wassaw Sound, secure in the protection of A fearless blockader — U. S. S. Kansas This little screw steamer, under Lieutenant-Commander P. G. Watmough, with four other vessels no more formidable than she, stood her ground when the great ironclad ram Raleigh came down from Wilmington on May 7, 1864, and attempted to raise the blockade at the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The Raleigh trained her ten guns on the little vessels for nine hours. But they replied with vigor, and finally Flag-Officer W. F. Lynch, C. S. N., under whose direction the Raleigh had been built, judged it best to retire, since she was hardly in a state of completion to warrant coming to close quarters. To the Kansas belongs the honor of capturing the famous blockade-runner Tristram Shandy, May 15,
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
f 1864, when his health was so broken that he was relieved. In January, 1865, he took the blockade-runner Owl out from Wilmington and over the bar near Fort Caswell, the very night that the forts surrendered to the Federal fleet. Maffit arrived at ver a wide range. The Stonewall, a dread Confederate destroyer Commodore Thomas T. Craven trips from Bermuda to Wilmington, and was then fitted out as a commerce-destroyer, being renamed the Tallahassee and put under the command of Commander John Taylor Wood. She set out from Wilmington in August. A successful three weeks cruise extended as far as Halifax; nearly thirty coasting and fishing vessels were destroyed. In October, she became the Olustee and took seven prizes. This ended h cargo of cotton. Bringing back much needed supplies for Lee's army, she was unable, in January, 1865, to enter either Wilmington or Charleston, the only ports then in the hands of the Confederacy. So her captain was compelled to take her to Liverp
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
main ship-channel at Charleston Harbor was obstructed by sinking 16 vessels of the Stone fleet. December 31, 1861. Two boats under Acting-Masters A. Allen and H. L. Sturges, from the U. S. S. Mount Vernon, destroyed a light-ship off Wilmington, N. C., which the Confederates had fitted up for a gunboat. Capture of the town of Biloxi, Miss., by U. S. gunboats Lewis, Water Witch, and New London, with Federal forces from Ship Island. January, 1862. January 1, 1862. Confed. Coff Charleston, S. C., by Confed. submarine torpedo-boat H. L. Hunley. February 16-29, 1864. Bombardment of Fort Powell, Ala., by Adml. Farragut. March, 1864. March 6, 1864. U. S. gunboat Peterhoff sunk by collision off Wilmington, N. C. March 11-15, 1864. A naval expedition from Brashear City captures camp, arms, and flag on Atchafalaya River, La. April, 1864. April 1, 1864. U. S. Army stmr. Maple Leaf blown up by torpedo in St. John's River, Fla. Apr