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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Tuskegee (Alabama, United States) or search for Tuskegee (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
for me a new period. I have fulfilled as well as I could the tasks of the summer, and must now have a little rest, a day or so, and then begin in good earnest to prepare for the autumn and winter work, in which A. A.W. comes first, and endless correspondence. To Maud 241 Beacon Street, December 19, 1894. Last Sunday evening I spoke in Trinity Church, having been invited to do so by the rector, Dr. Donald. Wonders will never cease. The meeting was in behalf of the colored school at Tuskegee, which we A. A.W.'s visited after our Congress. I dressed myself with unusual care. Dr. Donald gave me the place of honor and took me in and upon the platform in the chancel where we all sat. Governor Greenhalge was the first speaker. I came about fourth, and to my surprise was distinctly heard all over the house. You may easily imagine that I enjoyed this very much, although it was rather an anxious moment when I stepped forward to speak.... We are all much shocked at the death of dear
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
und of hope. February 7.... I hope to take life more easily now than for some time past, and to have rest from the slavery of pen and ink. February 28. .... was interviewed by a Miss X, who has persevered in trying to see me, and at last brought a note from--. she is part editor of a magazine named success, and, having effected an entrance, proceeded to interview me, taking down my words for her magazine, thus getting my ideas without payment, a very mean proceeding... . March 21. Tuskegee benefit, Hollis Street Theatre. this meeting scored a triumph, not only for the performers, but for the race. Bishop Lawrence presided with much good grace and appreciation. Paul Dunbar was the least distinct. Professor Dubois, of Atlanta University, read a fine and finished discourse. Booker Washington was eloquent as usual, and the Hampton quartet was delightful. At the tea which followed at Mrs. Whitman's studio, I spoke with these men and with Dunbar's wife, a nearly white Woma
, 84. Trinity Church, Boston, II, 141, 199. Trip to Cuba, I, 173-77, 265. Trollope, Frances M., I, 114. Trowbridge, J. T., II, 273. Troy, I, 298, 308. Troyon, Constant, II, 172. Trumbull, Senator, I, 239. Trumbull, John, I, 5. Tschaikowsky, Peter, II, 295. Tuckerman, G. F., I, 248. Tuckerman, H. T., I, 231. Tuesday Club, II, 354. Tufts College, I, 218; II, 324. Tukey, I, 250. Tumwater, II, 134. Turin, II, 24, 26. Turkey, I, 261; II, 394. Tuskegee, II, 200. Tweedy, Mrs., I, 227, 231. Twelve O'Clock Talks, II, 107, 178. Twisleton, Edward, I, 133, 314; II, 6. Twitchell, Joseph, II, 187. Tybee, I, 322, 334. Tyndall, William, I, 222, 228. Umberto I, I, 29-31, 248, 277. Unitarian Association, II, 4. Unitarian Women, Alliance of, II, 178, 181. Unitarianism, I, 109, 185, 259, 388. United States Army, II, 15. Universal Peace Union, I, 319. Upson, Arthur, II, 346. Utah, II, 17. Utica, I, 344. Va