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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
rs of the Confederate President, he packed up all the papers of the office, and left with Mr. Davis and his Cabinet. At Danville the departments were reopened and a temporary capitol was established there. Upon receipt of dispatches, April 10th, cot to temporarily join and protect his family. The history of the capture of his party and family has been written. Danville to Greensboro. The government was established for a week at Danville, Virginia, where the various departments were opDanville, Virginia, where the various departments were opened, and routine business taken up. The surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia necessitated retirement to Greensboro, North Carolina. The surrender of this hitherto invincible army came with the paralyzing shock of a sudden earthquake, stouta was to reach the Trans-Mississippi Department with safety, and by steady traveling, as no speed could be made. From Danville on I saw the government, with its personnel, slowly but surely falling to pieces. Grief, sorrow, and often indignation
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The red Artillery. (search)
was ordered to remove the stores of the arsenal, as far as could be done, to Lynchburg, and was informed that the President and chief officials would proceed to Danville, and the line be reestab-lished between Danville and Lynchburg. I immediately had the canal-boats of the city taken possession of, and began to load them as rDanville and Lynchburg. I immediately had the canal-boats of the city taken possession of, and began to load them as rapidly as possible with machiney, tools, stores, etc., to be carried to Lynchburg. As a large supply of prepared ammunition could not be taken, I had a large force employed in destroying it by throwing it in the river. Supplies of value to families were given away to those who applied. By midnight the boats laden with storr knew. About 2 o'clock in the morning General Gorgas, the Chief of Ordnance, came to the arsenal to tell me that he was about to leave with the President for Danville, and to report to him there. I never reported to him till fifteen years later, when I met him at Sewanee, Tenn., the Vice-Chancellor of the University of the So