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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 314 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 192 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 108 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 68 16 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 46 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 42 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 37 1 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 36 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 27 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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fitly opens the new period of Charles Sumner's career. For a description of Boston in 1825, see ante, vol. i. p. 45. The characteristics of the people and society were much the same from 1820-1860. There are touches of Boston in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 1850 from 115,000 to 137,000, and five years later exceeded 160,000. Its territory was still confined to the peninsula,—Charlestown, Roxbury, and Dorchester being as yet suburban towns. Mansions surrounded by gardens had disappeared, and had given place to blocks. Fort Hill, long a residential quarter of rich people, had been abandoned to tenement-houses. The Back Bay, now the seat of fine houses and noble churches, was still a waste, and mostly under the sea. Beacon Street ended in front of the site of the Public Garden. What is called our best society lived on streets looking on the Common, or on those lying near by, all w
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
ons to attend mass meetings in other States,—Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Ohio,—and to speak in the cities of New York, Brooklyn, Albany, and Philadelphia; but except a week in Maine, he confined himself to Massachusetts, speaking in the principal towns and cities, In Maine he spoke at Portland, Bath. Waterville, Augusta, Gardiner, and perhaps one or two other points in that State In Massachusetts he spoke at Central Hall, Boston, September 14, and at other dates at Plymouth, Roxbury, Somerville, Chelsea, Milford, Newburyport, Dorchester, Amherst, Pittsfield, Great Barrington, Adams, Stockbridge, Chicopee, Springfield, Lynn, Salem, Brookline, Nantucket, Fall River, Taunton, Lowell, Fitchburg, Dedham, Canton, Worcester, and Cambridge. and on October 31 at Faneuil Hall. The speech was not written out, and no report is preserved He wrote a summary of points on a single sheet, which is preserved, and he had always with him an anonymous political pamphlet, much referred
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
character. Professor Huntington's letter, October 10, to Sumner. Sumner arrived from New York at Longfellow's, in Cambridge, Sunday morning, November 2. He arrived by the Fall River line at Harrison Square in Dorchester, and drove through Roxbury and Brookline to Cambridge. On Monday he was driven to the house of Amos A. Lawrence in Brookline. The morning papers expressed the tenderness of public feeling towards him. Boston Atlas, November 3. Here he was met in the early afternoon by a number of prominent citizens, who had driven in eighteen carriages from the State House. The company, taking Sumner in an open barouche with Dr. Perry and Professor Huntington, proceeded to Roxbury, and thence to the Boston line, where they were met by a cavalcade of citizens numbering seven hundred, and were awaited by a vast concourse of people. At Northampton Street, just north of the southern boundary of the city, Sumner's carriage was driven alongside of one containing A. H. Rice the