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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 4 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 60 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 5 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) or search for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
. A depot was required for supplying coal, provisions and stores at a point where our ships could find safe anchorage at all times, and where machine shops and docks could be constructed for refitting vessels. The work of supplying vessels was one of vital importance, and a harbor was also Plan of the attack on forts Walker and Beauregard, November 7, 1861. needed as a base of operations against the whole Southern States. The choice of harbors lay between Bull's Bay, Port Royal, Brunswick and Fernandina. The latter, for some reasons, was considered an available place, but finally the Department concurred in the opinion of Flag Officer Dupont that Port Royal contained all the required advantages. Port Royal is one of the finest harbors in the United States, with water sufficient for the largest vessels. It is about equidistant between Charleston and Savannah, and so well aware were the Confederates of its importance that one of their first acts was to fortify it against
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
r. On the night of June 23d he left the vessel in the first cutter, accompanied by Acting-Ensign J. E. Jones, Acting-Master's Mate William L. Howorth, and fifteen men, crossed the western bar, and passed the forts and town of Smithville without discovery. Near the Zeke Island batteries, Cushing came very near being run down by a steamer — doubtless a blockade-runner, bound out, with a load of cotton — and also narrowly escaped the notice of a guard-boat. As Cushing came abreast of the Brunswick batteries, fifteen miles from his starting-point, the moon came out from the clouds, and disclosed the party to the sentinels on the river-bank, who hailed the boat, and then opened fire upon her. The people in the fort were roused, and the confusion seemed to be general. Cushing pulled for the opposite bank, and along up the other shore, until he got out of sight. When within seven miles of Wilmington both men and boat were secreted in a marsh. When the sun rose, Cushing watched for