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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 254 78 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 12 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 48 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 40 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 34 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 31 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Brooklyn (New York, United States) or search for Brooklyn (New York, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
te arrived in Pensacola Harbor on April 12, 1861, the day Fort Sumter was fired upon. With the Brooklyn, she landed reenforcements at Fort Pickens. On May 13th, Captain H. A. Adams of the Sabine issreenforcement of Fort Sumter, instead of a force of the older soldiers from Fort Monroe, in the Brooklyn. The Star of the West made a feeble effort to enter Charleston Harbor. She was fired upon, ando colors hoisted at Sumter or sign of assistance from the fort, turned and went to sea. Had the Brooklyn been sent, as President Buchanan, to his credit be it said, intended, and as had been first arrovised defenses, none of which had before fired a shot, would have been quickly silenced by the Brooklyn's guns; the ship would have occupied the harbor; Sumter would have been manned and provisioned,North perish, need not be discussed; but the patent fact remains that the failure to employ the Brooklyn instead of the Star of the West, the failure to garrison the other forts of the South, the fail
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
ny of the older vessels included in the active list, and some still in commission that bore historic names and had seen service in the War of 1812. They had been the floating schools for heroes, and were once more called to serve their turn. The newer ships comprised a noble list. Within five years previous to the outbreak of hostilities, the magnificent steam frigates Merrimac, Niagara, Colorado, Wabash, Minnesota, and Roanoke had been built, and the fine steam sloops-of-war Hartford, Brooklyn, Lancaster, Richmond, Pensacola, Pawnee, Michigan, Narragansett, Dacotah, Iroquois, Wyoming, and Seminole had been placed in commission. These ships were of the highest developed type of construction and compared favorably at that time with any war vessels in the world. Summing up the serviceable navy, we find that it consisted of two sailing frigates, eleven sailing sloops, one screw frigate, five screw sloops of the first class, three side-wheel steamers, eight screw sloops of the sec
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
and their sisters will play in the coming struggle. The view was taken from the lighthouse by Edwards of New Orleans. The relief of Fort Pickens was the first dramatic incident of the war in which the navy played a part. In January, 1861, the Brooklyn, Captain W. S. Walker, was sent with some United States troops on board to reenforce the little garrison at Fort Pickens. But, owing to the conciliatory policy of the Buchanan Administration, a joint-order from the Secretary of War and the Secrm not to land the troops unless Fort Pickens should be attacked. On April 12th Lieutenant John L. Worden, later of Monitor fame, arrived with a special message from Secretary Welles, and that night the Fort was saved by soldiers landed from the Brooklyn. complexities, the blade that cut the life-artery of the newly risen Confederate Government might never have been forged. The great blockade of European history was that put in force by England against the ports of France and Spain at the be
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
Kineo, and Wissahickon; Farragut led the second, or center, division, composed of the Hartford, Brooklyn, and Richmond, and Captain Bell, in the Sciota, headed the third, having under his command the ls of the oncoming ships. She struck the Mississippi, wounding her badly, and all but sank the Brooklyn. The men on the little tug Mosher, which pushed the fire-raft against the Hartford, sank with ender of the Confederate Commander Kennon and the crew of the burning Governor Moore. As the Brooklyn came through the opening in the barrier, she ran afoul of the little Kineo and almost sank her. A few minutes later the ugly shape of the turtle-back ram Manassas appeared almost under the Brooklyn's bows. Had she not changed her course a little all would have been over, but the blow glanced fn the sloping topsides of the ram while she was so close that she was grating along beneath the Brooklyn's guns. A quartermaster, standing in the fore chains, hove the lead at him and knocked him ove
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
hickest the Confederate gunners fired even far more rapidly, enveloping the vessels, and especially the Hartford and the Brooklyn, in a veritable hail of missiles. The Fort was an old five-sided brick works mounting its guns in three tiers. It was ccuracy of their fire was rarely equalled in the war. In the terrible conflict the Hartford was struck twenty times, the Brooklyn thirty, the Octorora seventeen, the Metacomet eleven, the Lackawanna five, the Ossipee four, the Monongahela five, the Kttack with four monitors in the starboard column, close inshore. As they passed the Fort and water batteries, where the Brooklyn and Richmond came very nearly going aground, they completely smothered the Confederate fire. The Tecumseh, under the he Hartford dodged her, although it had been the desire of brave old Admiral Buchanan's heart to sink the flagship. The Brooklyn had a narrow escape, and the Monongahela, under Commander James H. Strong, attempted to ram the Tennessee, and drove, bo