Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) or search for Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
Edwin J. Christian, elected at the reorganization about two weeks before; Captain C. C. Blacknall, of of Company G, then became Major of the regiment, Isaac J. Young, succeeding to the Captaincy of Company G. Major Christian was a native of Montgomery county—a gallant soldier, while in all relations of his life he had borne a high and honorable name. Captain Ambrose Scarborough, of Company C, though written as among the killed in the battle, fell on the afternoon preceding while leading a reconnoitering party. A native also of Montgomery county, his career had been alike honorable in peace and war. The officers wounded in the battle were, Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Johnston, Captain William Johnston, Captain I. J. Young, Lieutenant McDonald. Lieutenants Luria and Knott, both of Granville, were killed. The killed of privates and non-commissioned officers numbered thirty-five, while seventy-eight was the number of the same ranks wounded. These figures are taken from Moore's Roster, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
in the Kanawha river in 1862. The 14th Virginia Regiment was in Jenkins', afterwards McCausland's, Brigade, and did service in West Virginia, the Shenandoah Valley, and around Richmond. It was composed of three companies from Greenbrier, one from Augusta, one from Charlotte, one from Upshur, one from Rockbridge, and a large portion of two others were from this county (Captain William A. Lackey's and Alexander M. Peck's), the remainder of these two companies being from Roanoke, Pulaski, Montgomery and Highland counties. It was among the best mounted regiments in the service, and the discipline and their soldierly bearing were noticeable. James Cochran, of Augusta county, was Colonel; John A. Gibson, of Rockbridge, Lieutenant-Colonel; B. F. Eakle, of the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs, Major, and Edward S. Roe, of Orange Courthouse, Surgeon. It was one of the regiments out of four that raided Pennsylvania to enforce the order of levying a tax of several hundred thousand dollars
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
During the years 1858-59 he was a member of the State Legislature which called the Constitutional Convention. In the next year the war had come. With the martial blood of his ancestors tingling in his veins, he at once prepared for the fight. He raised in his own parish a company of cavalry known as the Jefferson Chasseurs. These were the young men of the plantations, accustomed to the saddle from infancy and perfect masters of their animals. Being chosen their captain, he went on to Montgomery, the seat of the Confederate government, and offered the services of his company. The value of cavalry was not appreciated by the new government. The Virginia campaigns had not yet happened to teach them the lesson. The cavalry was declined as too costly to support, and Captain Waggaman was compelled to return and so declare to his men. But he was determined. He asked the company to fight on foot, but not one man complied. Coming to New Orleans he enlisted as a private in the 10th L
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
uld he have welcomed a settlement between the contending States on the firm basis of constitutional rights for both sections, safety for his own people, malice and injury to none, and an enduring peace with honor. That was not to be. He left the Senate in March, 1861, following not the suggestions of personal ambition or his own interest, but the hard and rugged path of duty. Very soon afterwards the Commonwealth of Virginia sent him as one of her representatives to the new government at Montgomery. He performed that mission. On the 21st of July, 1861, he was called by President Davis to take the position of Secretary of State for the Confederacy, from which Mr. Toombs, of Georgia, had resigned. He filled that important trust with eminent ability until the new, or permanent, Confederate Constitution and Government went into operation on the 22d of February, 1862. Prior to that event the Commonwealth of Virginia elected Mr. Hunter, and, as I remember, unanimously, to the Confede
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
Maryland campaign. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 16, 1897] The Cavalry fight at Boonsboro'graphically described. The Ninth Virginia and Eighth Illinois regiments Cross Sabres—the former suffer severely, but capture some prisoners. During the campaign in Maryland in 1862, the 9th Virginia Cavalry was attached to the brigade commanded by General Fitz Lee. After nine days spent among the fine hay and rich yellow cornfields of Montgomery and Frederick counties, the regiment crossed the Catoctin mountain at Hamburg, at dawn on the morning of September 14th. Hamburg was a rude and scattering village on the crest of the mountain, where the manufacture of brandy seemed to be the chief employment of the villagers, and at the early hour of our passage through the place, both the men and women gave proof that they were free imbibers of the product of their stills, and it was not easy to find a sober inhabitant of either sex. To our troopers, descending the wester
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ner, whom he often opposed in debate, declared that Mr. Benjamin was the most eloquent speaker to whom he ever listened. The stormy days of ‘61 came on, and he, with the other Southern Senators, withdrew from that body. His farewell address occupied two days in its delivery, and was admitted by all to be the most eloquent and forcible effort on either side. It was in the main a demonstration of the legality of States' rights. A genius. When the provisional government was formed at Montgomery, President Davis selected Mr. Benjamin as his Attorney-General. Upon the consummation of the Confederacy he was made Secretary of War, and later on, Secretary of State. An idea of the versatility and erudition of this genius, may be formed from the fact that he filled these three Cabinet positions to the satisfaction of the President and with credit to himself. Mr. Benjamin was commonly referred to as the brains of the Confederacy, and it was a universal custom of President Davis's to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
hmond, and took his seat in the Senate with his colleague from Louisiana, General Edward H. Sparrow. He passed through Montgomery on his way to Richmond, and here Mrs. Semmes met her parents, who were delighted that a son-in-law of theirs had this hly supplied with funds. Yes, indeed, said Mrs. Semmes, we used to get all manner of nice provisions and hampers from Montgomery, and never knew how they reached us so safely, for everything came to us contraband. Our table was always well supplieweek as also the congressmen. Mr. Semmes had sent Mrs. Semmes in a box-car, by the Richmond and Danville road, towards Montgomery. A week later he joined her in Georgia, and in Augusta heard of Lee's surrender. Thence the way was made by wagon andrd that her husband would be pursued and she determined to save him. She drove to a farm-house, some miles distant from Montgomery, and asked the farmer to give her husband shelter. All this was without Mr. Semmes' knowledge. Bring him to me, said