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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 740 208 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 428 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 383 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 366 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 335 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 260 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 250 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 236 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 220 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 45 results in 10 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
make a diversion in front. Cheat Mountain Pass being carried, General Jackson, with his whole force, was to sweep down the mountain and fall upon the rear of the other Federal position; General Donaldson, with two regiments, was to gain a favorable position for attacking the enemy on the Lewisburg road, in flank or rear; and Loring was to advance, by the main road, on the Federal front. In case of failure, Anderson and Donaldson were to rejoin Loring, and Rust was to find his way back to Jackson. The troops gained their designated positions with remarkable promptness and accuracy in point of time, considering the distance and the difficulties to be overcome. Colonel Rust's attack on Cheat Mountain was to be the signal for the general advance of all the troops. It was anxiously expected, from early dawn, throughout the day. On every side was continuously heard, What has become of Rust? Why don't he attack? Rust must have lost his way. The Tennesseeans, under Anderson, became s
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
there met Loring and his division, sent from Jackson by Pemberton, whose headquarters were at Edwaeneral Joseph E. Johnston (who had arrived in Jackson on the 13th and assumed command), and breakin, joined the main body in the neighborhood of Jackson, out of which General Johnston had marched wiears, in the shape of Grant, who had heard in Jackson of Pemberton's designs to attack him piecemeacally complained of the telegraphic genius at Jackson. The telegraphic geniuses at Young's Point adays, the town of Brandon, ten miles east of Jackson, was reached. It had been generally supposedh General Johnston was removing supplies from Jackson, from the track; and the officers had to drawe enabled me to depart on the last train from Jackson that went east-riding to Enterprise on the toeral Johnston was too sick when he arrived at Jackson to take command in the field ( Narrative, pag no captain of the South excelled him; but at Jackson he was flustered by a responsibility suddenly
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
saw barefooted men stand in the snow at our service, and one of the chaplains reported that in February, 1864, he preached in the open air to a very large congregation, who stood in snow several inches deep during the entire service, and that he counted in the number fourteen barefooted men. And this eagerness to hear the Gospel was even more manifest during the most active campaigns. On those famous marches of the Valley campaign of 1862, which won for our brave fellows the soubriquet of Jackson's foot cavalry, I never found the men too weary to assemble in large numbers at the evening prayer-meeting, and enter with hearty zest into the simple service. At half-past 7 o'clock in the morning the day of the battle of Cross Keys, a large part of Elzey's Brigade promptly assembled on an intimation that there would be preaching; the chaplain of the Twenty-fifth Virginia Regiment (Rev. Dr. George B. Taylor, now a missionary to Italy) was interrupted at thirdly, in his able and eloquent
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
visit, deeply considering the critical condition of Pemberton's army at Vicksburg, around which General Grant was then decisively drawing his lines. He informed me that he had in contemplation a plan for concentrating a succoring army at Jackson, Mississippi, under the command of General Johnston, with a view of driving Grant from before Vicksburg by a direct issue-at-arms. He suggested that possibly my corps might be needed to make the army strong enough to handle Grant, and asked me my views. I replied that there was a better plan, in my judgment, for relieving Vicksburg than by a direct assault upon Grant. I proposed that the army then concentrating at Jackson, Mississippi, be moved swiftly to Tullahoma, where General Bragg was then located with a fine army, confronting an army of about equal strength under General Rosecrans, and that at the same time the two divisions of my corps be hurried forward to the same point. The simultaneous arrival of these reinforcements would give
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
m with rods of iron. Strong friendships and the utmost familiarity of personal relationship grew out of this life-long intercourse between the house servants and their masters; and a great many body-servants not only followed their masters to the field, and devoted themselves to their service in the tenderest way, but fought, bled, and died for them. There are some touching instances of this intercourse and this devotion which are worth relating. When General Joseph E. Johnston was at Jackson, at the Lamar House, in the full tide of a brilliant reception, an old negro woman, in a coarse sunbonnet, with a cotton umbrella under her arm, rapped at the door, and asked: Is dis Mr. Johnston's room? Yes. Mr. Joe Johnston's room? Yes. I wants to see him, den ; and in marched the old lady, going up to the distinguished soldier, and laying her hand familiarly upon his epauleted shoulder. Johnston turned, a look of surprise and gladness overspread his face, he took both the bony, bird
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
its march, it crossed the railroad and rejoined Stuart, who, with Jackson's Corps, pursued the enemy to the crossings of the Rappahannock at of the fortifications, when it was found that it had to cope with Jackson's infantry, instead of Stuart's cavalry. The guns from the fortifhis early life. Ashby, but a little before, and while attached to Jackson's army, had been killed, about the close of the magnificent campai Buford's Brigade of Federal cavalry, who, having captured some of Jackson's stragglers, had heard from them, for the first time, of his. movtill late in the evening. During the entire day he was uneasy for Jackson's safety, and, in the evening, requested Lieutenant Payne to send ch, this detachment of the Black Horse opened communications with Jackson's Corps, near Groveton, a place on the Warrenton turnpike, below Nght, during which the Black Horse acted as aides and couriers. In Jackson's report of this campaign he extols the conduct of this command, n
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
high piece of ground, from which they had full view of the battle made against Jackson We could see the solid masses of the Federals forming for a charge against Jackson's weakening lines. They were gathered in immense force, and it seemed impossible that Jackson's thin lines could withstand the onset. The Federals moved forwardJackson's thin lines could withstand the onset. The Federals moved forward steadily, surging on in solid blocks, headed directly for Jackson's lines. Just then a courier arrived in great haste with orders from General Lee for me to hurry to the assistance of Jackson. It was in the very crisis of the battle. I had very serious. doubts about being able to reach General Jackson in time to be of any serJackson's lines. Just then a courier arrived in great haste with orders from General Lee for me to hurry to the assistance of Jackson. It was in the very crisis of the battle. I had very serious. doubts about being able to reach General Jackson in time to be of any service to him. I had no doubt, however, that I could impede or paralyze the immense mass of men that was pressing steadily to his overthrow. We were standing on the flank of the advancing columns. They swept on at right angles to our line of vision. They were within easy artillery range, and I felt certain that a heavy enfilading
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
etition of history to mention, at length, the movements of Jackson's Brigade that day. It was Bee who gave him the name of Start of the war, his old brigade and division were known as Jackson's foot cavalry. What sort of man is your Stonewall, anywahed, and he believed they could do anything he commanded. Jackson's men will follow him to the devil, and he knows it, said ive the public a false impression of the religious side of Jackson's character. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, is an interesting study to follow the successive steps of Jackson's military career, and watch his development as occasion red under Napoleon, and pronounced it extra-Napoleonic. In Jackson's military life there was no dangerous precociousness. Heer has carved, and if he had not thrown his chippings over Jackson's grave, I would not care to look beyond the beauty of his heaven on that paper, but you can't pass this post. To Jackson's death this whole land has been speedy to do full justice
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Stuart in camp and field. (search)
When Jackson was disabled, and Stuart assumed command, and sent to ascertain Jackson's views and wishes as to the attack on the next morning, the wounded commander to be sufficient to make the reputation of any soldier. Stuart's attack with Jackson's Corps on the next morning fully justified this confidence. His employment on the preceding December, the same masterly handling of his guns had protected Jackson's right toward the Massaponnax, which was the real key of the battle; and in t one of his favorite ballads. This eccentric habit attracted the attention of Jackson's men at Chancellorsville-men habituated to the gravity and prayers of their wounded leader. Stuart led Jackson's Corps against General Hooker's intrenchments, with drawn sabre and floating plume, singing Old Joe Hooker, will you come out of cers, Stuart passed the long months of the winter succeeding the hard battle. Jackson's quarters were at Moss neck, some miles down the river, and they exchanged vi
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
Lee's plan of attack contemplated the turning of McClellan's right flank by Jackson's movement through Hanover. A. P. Hill was stationed on the left of the Confe that desperate venture and listening in vain for the guns that should tell of Jackson's arrival. At last General Lee decides that time is even more important than along the river, delaying him with threatening demonstrations to gain time for Jackson's establishment well in his rear. The march of the latter, for the first fourggle seemed to be at hand. But now Longstreet's columns, urged on by tales of Jackson's need, begin to file through Thoroughfare gap, and soon the Confederate rightAt two o'clock the enemy moved in masses upon the railroad embankments forming Jackson's left, and here Hill waged, against overwhelming odds, the fiercest contest ot, and, just at sunrise, poured Hooker's, Mansfield's, and Sumner's Corps upon Jackson's thin line. For several hours Jackson sustained this attack, but at length h