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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 740 208 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 428 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 383 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 366 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 335 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 260 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 250 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 236 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 220 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
ted in this naval attack, would not rest upon his defeat, but would soon make another effort, with renewed vigor, and on a larger scale. I was therefore very much concerned when, scarcely a week afterward, the War Department compelled me to send Cooke's and Clingman's commands back to North Carolina, and, early in May, two other brigades [S. R. Gist's and W. H. T. Walker's], numbering five thousand men, with two batteries of light artillery, to reenforce General Joseph E. Johnston at Jackson, Mississippi. The fact is that, on the 10th of May, Mr. Seddon, the Secretary of War, had even directed that still another force of five thousand men should be withdrawn from my department to be sent to Vicksburg to the assistance of General Pemberton. But my protest against so exhaustive a drain upon my command was fortunately heeded, and I was allowed to retain the reduced force I then had under me, amounting on the 1st of June, for the whole State of South Carolina, to not more than ten thous
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
ay 10th, 11th, and 12th5,145 French's detachmentMay 12th 550 French's divisionMay 19th 4,174 Jackson's cavalryMay 17th 4,477 Jackson's cavalry increase beforeJune 10th643 Quarles's brigadeMay 26Jackson's cavalry increase beforeJune 10th643 Quarles's brigadeMay 26th 2,200 Two regiments Georgia State line  1,200 Furloughed men returned 3,399 Recruits 799 Returned deserters 649      84,328 All these figures are official except for Mercer's brigade and the two regiments of the Georgia State line. For the strength of Jackson's cavalry division, see General S. D. Lee's return May 10th, and the return of General Johnston's Army June 10th, 1864. f the Fifteenth Corps by two brigades of Bate's Confederate division and Armstrong's brigade of Jackson's cavalry dismounted, supported by Smith's brigade of Bate's division and Ferguson's and Ross's brigades of Jackson's cavalry. Lewis's Kentucky brigade attacked the front of Osterhaus's division without success. Bullock's Florida brigade charged along the Marietta road and was driven back,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
ridges across Walnut Creek and the Oconee River, had moved against Macon. These operations had been ordered by General Sherman upon a grand scale; picked men and horses had been placed under the command of Generals McCook and Stoneman, with the purpose to destroy our sole line of communication, and to release, at Andersonville, 34,000 Federal prisoners. These raiders, under McCook, came in contact with General Roddey's cavalry at Newnan, and were there held in check till Wheeler's and Jackson's troops came up; whereupon the combined forces, directed by General Wheeler, attacked the enemy with vigor and determination, and finally routed them. Whilst these operations were progressing in the vicinity of Newnan, General Cobb was gallantly repelling the assault of Stoneman at Macon, when Iverson came up and engaged the enemy with equal spirit and success. The flanks of the Federal army were at this juncture so well protected by the Chattahoochee and the deep ravines which run dow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
an, with his aged wife, occupied a palatial brick mansion a mile above the town. The grand old house, its splendid library and collection of pictures, the furniture and all the family wearing-apparel, made a bonfire that was seen for many a mile around. From Buchanan Hunter crossed the Blue Ridge via the lofty Peaks of Otter, and moved by the shortest route direct to Lynehburg. To defend that place and drive Hunter back General Lee had sent there the Second Corps of his army, Stonewall Jackson's old Corps, under Lieutenant-General Jubal A. Early. Breckinridge was already there with his small force from Rockfish Gap, when (on Friday, June 1 7th) Early made his appearance with the advance division of his army corps. That day I had been ordered, with my own and Brigadier-General William L. Jackson's brigade of cavalry, to go ten miles out to New London, reenforce McCausland, and assume command of the three brigades, and retard Hunter as much as possible, to give time for the whole
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at New Market, Va., May 15, 1864. (search)
an Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; McClanahan's Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. In an address delivered at the anniversary celebration of the battle General Echols referred to the bravery of a company of Missourians who were in the battle. They were 70 in number, and, according to the Rockingham register of May 20th, 1864, they lost 47 in killed and wounded. The strength of Breckinridge's forces was about 5000. General Sigel, in an estimate based on the official reports, places Breckinridge's strength at 4816, as follows: Wharton's brigade, 1578; Echols's brigade, 1622; engineer co., 56; cadet corps, 227; company of Missourians, 70; Jackson's battery, 100; Chapman's battery, 135; Callahan's battery, 93; cadet's section, 35; Imboden's cavalry (not including the 62d Va., with Wharton), 900. The losses were 42 killed, 522 wounded, and 13 missing == 577. These figures include the losses of the cadet corps, which numbered 225, and sustained a loss of 8 killed and 46 wounded.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 10.75 (search)
ent in reducing transportation and getting provisions from Waynesboro‘. The official reports at this place showed about two thousand mounted men for duty in the cavalry, which was composed of four small brigades, to wit: Imboden's, McCausland's, Jackson's, and Jones's (now Johnson's). The official reports of the infantry showed ten thousand muskets for duty, including Vaughn's dismounted cavalry. Besides Breckinridge's own infantry division, under Elzey (now under Vaughn, afterward under Echolat daylight on the 11th, McCausland on the Georgetown pike, while the infantry, preceded by Imboden's cavalry under Colonel Smith, turned to the left at Rockville, so as to reach the 7th street pike which runs by Silver Springs into Washington. Jackson's cavalry moved on the left flank. The previous day had been very warm, and the roads were exceedingly dusty, as there had been no rain for several weeks. The heat during the night had been very oppressive, and but little rest had been obtaine
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
McCausland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John McCausland: 14th Va.----; 16th Va.----; 17th Va.----; 25th Va.----; 37th Va. Battalion,----. B. T. Johnson's Brigade: 8th Va.----; 21st Va.----; 22d Va.---; 34th Va. Battalion,----; 36th Va. Battalion,----. Jackson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. H. B. Davidson: 1st Md.----; 19th Va.----; 20th Va.----; 46th Va. Battalion,----; 47th Va. Battalion,----. Rosser's (Fitz Lee's) division, Maj. Gen. Thos. L. Rosser. Wickham's Brigade: 1st Va.----; 2d Va.----; 3d Va.-Battery (Milledge's); Va. Battery (Kirkpatrick's); Va. Battery (Massie's). King's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. Floyd King: Va. Battery (Bryan's); Va. Battery (Chapman's); Va. Battery (Lowry's). Horse Artillery: Md. Battery (Griffin's); Va. Battery (Jackson's); Va. Battery (Lurty's); Va. Battery (McClanahan's); Va. Battery (Johnston's); Va. Battery (Shoemaker's); Va. Battery (Thomson's). The maximum effective strength of Early's army in the Valley is estimated at about 20,000 of all arms, about
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
divisions, and the other from Major Anderson, Forrest's chief-of-staff. From the first I learned that Forrest with a part of his command was in my front (this had also been obtained from prisoners); that Jackson with his division and all the wagons and artillery of the rebel cavalry, marching from Tuscaloosa via Trion toward Centreville, had encamped the night before at Hill's plantation, three miles beyond Scottsboro‘; that Croxton [Union], with the brigade detached at Elyton, had struck Jackson's rear-guard at Trion and interposed himself between it and the train; that Jackson had discovered this, and intended to attack Croxton at daylight of April 1st. I learned from the other dispatch that Chalmers had also arrived at Marion, Alabama, and had been ordered to cross to the east side of the Cahawba near that place for the purpose of joining Forrest in my front, or in the works at Selma. I also learned that a force of dismounted men was stationed at Centreville, with orders to hol