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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 740 208 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 428 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 383 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 366 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 335 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 260 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 250 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 236 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 220 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
, and on reporting to Major-General Ewell, of Jackson's army in the Valley, was allotted the First wn victories. No more succours could come to Jackson from the east; the coil of the snake around Lson. Remember, friend, Columbus and his egg. Jackson's performance hath illustrated this problem f chiefest traits of greatness I recognized in Jackson through these transactions: First, that urgenfunnel— almost a cul de sac. These then, were Jackson's dispositions. General Richard Taylor, withasse (kindly June water). For although it was Jackson's wont to enlighten none as to his plans; yet straggling Indian file. Well did I know how Jackson's soul at that hour would avouch that word ofey elected. To them, also, it was plain that Jackson's truth and justice and devotion to duty werentercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand kreat battle of July 3. In the West came Jackson, Miss., Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge. In [20 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
Cooper, Adjutant & Inspector General. Colonel Steuart was promoted to be Brigadier-General in the following March, and on reporting to Major-General Ewell, of Jackson's army in the Valley, was allotted the First Maryland regiment, Brown's troop of cavalry, and the Baltimore Light Artillery, which thus constituted the Maryland Ld a brigade of cavalry, and it was not until after the battle of Winchester (May 26) that he assumed command of the Line, which was attached to the second brigade Jackson's division, also under Steuart's command. On June 8th, at Cross Keys, he was wounded, and the command devolved on me. I retained it, and commanded the Maryland Lage of General Ewell, This is no time for swapping horses—I did not get my command to which I had been ordered. I was assigned to command the Second brigade of Jackson's division. On November 1, 1863, General Lee directed me to collect the Maryland troops and proceed to Hanover Junction, and ordered to report to me at once th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
ht and left flanks. To make an attack upon us, the enemy had to come directly through this open field. In a day or two, however, September 10th, about 2 P. M., our videts were driven in hurriedly, and the enemy at once made his appearance in full force. My company had now prepared for action in reality, ready to give the enemy a warm reception. It is proper to state just here, that Floyd's command did not exceed nineteen hundred available men. It consisted of Guy's battery, four pieces, Jackson's battery, two pieces, all six-pounders, a few cavalry companies, and the remainder of infantry. The enemy came bravely forward, and the battle raged furiously from 2 1/2 o'clock, P. M., until darkness caused a cessation of hostilities, which was, doubtless, agreeable and acceptable to both parties. The enemy fought with undaunted courage and bravery, making successive charges on our works. In the engagement Colonel Lytle (afterwards a Major-General), who commanded an Ohio regiment
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
enemy's rear-guard at White Oak Swamp about 9.30 A. M., and decided to force the crossing with artillery. It was 1.45 P. M. before twenty-eight guns could be concentrated and opened. Official Report of Colonel Crutchfield. Reports of Army of Northern Virginia, p. 525. The only battery of the enemy in sight was at once driven off, but in a short while eighteen guns were opened in reply from behind a wood, and a brisk contest was maintained until dark, when the enemy withdrew, having kept Jackson's whole force out of the critical action fought by Longstreet and A. P. Hill late in the afternoon at Frazier's Farm. The superior ammunition and guns of the enemy made this contest about an equal one; but even had the Confederate equipment fully equalled the Federal, the odds were by no means sufficient to warrant the expectation of any very speedy and decisive result. At one thousand yards' range, a well-manned artillery can hold its ground for a long time against double its force of o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. by Captain William L. Ritter. Paper no. 4. Thursday evening July 16th, 1863, the Confederate works at Jackson, Mississippi, were abandoned, Lieutenant Ritter's section being the last to leave them. Next day, the 17th, Brandon was reached, and on the 20th Morton. Here the section was paid off, after considerable insistance, not having received any money for a number of months. On the 24th of August the battery was attached to Preston's battalion of reserve artillery, and on the 5th of September, ordered to Demopolis, Alabama, for repairs. In new uniforms, well dressed, well drilled, and well equipped, on the 12th of October the battery took part in a review had for General Johnston, and was chosen to fire a salute of eleven guns in his honor; as also one afterwards on the 15th, in honor of the arrival of President Davis. At this place an effort was made to consolidate Moore's and Ritter's sections, but it failed, as the se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
biographer, peculiarly fit Dr. Dabney to tell the story of Jackson's life, or to delineate his character. We are confident, his great Superior said [with a magnanimity which matches Jackson's heroism], Tell him he has lost his left arm; but I have led, taught them, educated them, for a time, to appreciate Jackson's as the transcendant fame of all our war. It sounded in e by painting before you some select, significant action of Jackson's own, wherein you may judge for yourselves as freely as onder of the war. He who would aspire to work and fight as Jackson's next assistant, must be one who would not look back afteed by their own victories. No more succours could come to Jackson from the east; the coil of the snake around Lee and the Caom Conrad's Store, and showed its head at Lewiston. Thus, Jackson's army and Fremont's were upon the one side of the river, ed now but the one passage, which lay under the muzzles of Jackson's cannon, for all the bridges above and below had been bur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
even too much so to imply peculiar genius in Jackson. Remember, friend, Columbus and his egg. Jacd them. Shields, then, moves first to strike Jackson's rear, a detachment of cavalry, with two canlage, plant cannon at each end of it, spy out Jackson's trains, and begin to reach forth the hand ted: Colonel Carrell! you have as good as got Jackson's trains; they are right above here, in sightthither and doing irreparable mischief before Jackson's return. Such was also the Yankee's thougo myself, which may be to you a revelation of Jackson's mind, (and may also be taken as an example asse (kindly June water). For although it was Jackson's wont to enlighten none as to his plans; yet straggling Indian file. Well did I know how Jackson's soul at that hour would avouch that word ofhetic disappointment? Did not such a will as Jackson's then surge like a volcano at this default? ey elected. To them, also, it was plain that Jackson's truth and justice and devotion to duty were[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
pect; and Anthony and Reid are left to mark its passage. Vicksburg is sore beset, and Johnston calls and Breckinridge is going, and the Fifth Company asks to follow. Mobile, in passing, gives us new recruits, as rushing through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Bragg calls in turn and Breckinridge is sent. The Fifth is pushed to Rome and Chattanooga. The echoes of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike elsewhere. Morning finds us on the right. Breckinridge turns t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
And their life-blood went to color the tide. The fern on the hill-sides was splashed with blood, And down in the corn where poppies grew, Were redder stains than the poppies knew; And crimson-dyed was the rivers' flood. Murfreesboro and Stone river followed in quick succession. In Virginia the four companies participated at Chancellorsville, and at Gettysburg, Pa., were honored by being chosen to fire the two signal guns that opened the great battle of July 3. In the West came Jackson, Miss., Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge. In Virginia the battalion was doing brave work. The Russian Field Marshal Suwarrow once sent word to the Austrian Archduke Charles, I know nothing of defensive warfare; I only know how to attack. The Washington Artillery could not say they knew nothing of defensive warfare, but certainly it was always more to their inclination to take the aggressive, and at Drewry's Bluff Suwarrow's tactics of Stupay, Ibey (advance and strike), was the order of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
correct roster of the Confederate artillery present at Second Manassas, and also of that present during the Sharpsburg campaign? The following is sent, with the hope that it may elicit additions. and corrections: At Second Manassas. On Jackson's wing. Attached to Jackson's Old Division, (Major L. M. Shumaker, Chief of Artillery).—Brockenbrough's Maryland Battery; Carpenter's Virginia Battery; Caskie's (Hampden Artillery); Poague's (Rockbridge Artillery); Raines's (Lee Artillery); WJackson's Old Division, (Major L. M. Shumaker, Chief of Artillery).—Brockenbrough's Maryland Battery; Carpenter's Virginia Battery; Caskie's (Hampden Artillery); Poague's (Rockbridge Artillery); Raines's (Lee Artillery); Wooding's (Danville Artillery); Rice's; Cutshaw's—(8). Attached to A. P. Hill's Division, (Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker, Chief of Artillery).—Braxton's (Fredericksburg Artillery); Crenshaw's; Davidson's (Letcher Artillery); Latham's (Branch Artillery); McIntosh's (Pee Dee Artillery); Pegram's (Purcell Artillery); Fleet's (Middlesex Artillery)—(7). Attached to Ewell's Division, (Major A. R. Courtenay, Chief of Artillery); Lattimer's (Courtenay Artillery); J. R. Johnson's (Bedfo
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