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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 740 208 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 428 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 383 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 366 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 335 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 260 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 250 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 236 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 220 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
him of the delivery of the message, and that General Mahone had concluded to lead the two brigades himself, he expressed gratification. Leaving the Ragland House, we marched along the edge of the hills skirting Lieutenant Run to New Road, or Hickory street, and entered this road a hundred or two more yards east of the brigade, then marched westwardly to within a few yards of the bridge over this run, and then filed northwardly down the ravine on the east side of the run to Hannon's (now Jackson's) old ice-pond; here entered a military foot-path leading along the pond eastward to the head of the pond; thence filed eastwardly up a ravine along the same military foot-path to the Jerusalem plank-road. We are now at a point a few feet from the southwestern corner of the Jewish cemetery of to-day, and the position of the foot-path in this ravine along which we came is yet plainly marked. At the plank-road we are halted and counter-march by regiments, thereby placing each regiment wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
I suspect with no hearty desire to meet up with them, for he could but know that our force was not able to cope successfully with a full regiment. Upon reaching Jackson, we learned there that the regiment was the Third New York Cavalry, about six hundred strong, well mounted and thoroughly equipped with Spencer repeating carbines, and had passed through that town some hours before, and then must be near Murfreesboro, some twenty-five miles distant. After waiting several hours at Jackson, our guns were ordered back overland to Weldon, while the infantry, under Colonel Whitford's command, retired to Halifax. I shall always remember with pleasure one little followed the tattered battle-flags of Lee and of Jackson—rising from simple captain, grade by grade, through sheer force of skill and daring until as commander of Jackson's old corps he became Lee's right arm in that wondrous final campaign which has claimed the admiration of the brave of every nation. Virginia rebels. In con
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9 (search)
t; as an officer, courteous and urbane; as a soldier, fearless and chivalrous. He early commanded the respect and ultimately won the hearts of all of whom he held command. This brigade at the time he assumed command was in Rhodes' division of Jackson's corps. Ramseur remained in command without events of any particular importance occurring until he entered upon his Chancellorsville campaign. His report of that famous battle is so full and complete, and so clearly displays the unselfisrigade was promptly formed, advanced rapidly to a fence, where it met the Federals in a handto-hand encounter, repulsed them and stopped the pursuit for the night. It was while near me that Colonel Pendleton, whom I had intimately known when on Jackson's staff, fell mortally wounded. Napoleon said: The moral force in war is worth twice its physical effect. Unfortunately, from this time on, that moral force which leads to success in battle was, in this army, under its present leadership, sa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
United Confederate Veterans. The second anniversary of this organization was held in Jackson, Miss., June 2, 1891, in the Capitol, in the Hall of the House of Representatives. It was opened with prayer at 10:30 A. M., followed by addresses of welcome and response from the Governor of the State, Hon. John M. Stone, and Garksdale, E. Kirby Smith, C. W. Frazer, Thos. R. Markham. The resolutions were adopted unanimously by a rising vote. Resolutions of thanks to the ladies of Jackson for the tasty and beautiful decorations of the hall, and to the citizens of Jackson for their hospitality, were adopted. At 7:30 the Association adjourned sineJackson for their hospitality, were adopted. At 7:30 the Association adjourned sine die. At 6 P. M., before the convention, Miss Eliza Winter, in an appropriate address on behalf of, and at the request of Mrs. General B. G. Humphreys, presented a portrait of the late General Humphreys, encircled with flowers, to Ben Humphreys Camp of Confederate Veterans, of Crystal Springs, Miss. Dr. D. P. Lockwood, of said
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 17 (search)
The Confederate dead of Mississippi. Unveiling of a monument to them at Jackson, Miss., June 3, 1890. oration by Senator E. C. Walthall. Not since the memorable days of 1865 had so many men who wore the gray been at one time in the city of Jackson, Miss., as on this bright and balmy Wednesday, June 3, 1890. It was computed that the visitors numbered more than twenty thousand. Before the sun was up the streets were a moving mass of humanity. The old veterans were full of enthusiasm, anJackson, Miss., as on this bright and balmy Wednesday, June 3, 1890. It was computed that the visitors numbered more than twenty thousand. Before the sun was up the streets were a moving mass of humanity. The old veterans were full of enthusiasm, and cheer after cheer filled the air as they caught sight of one of their distinguished leaders. When General Gordon and Governor Stone appeared at the City Hall to head the line of March, both of them Were seized and born aloft upon the shoulders of as many old soldiers as could lay hands on them. At 10 o'clock this morning the National Guards of this State, under command of General Billups, marched from their quarters through the streets to the City Hall, where the grand procession for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument to the Confederate dead at Fredericksburg, Virginia, unveiled June 10, 1891. (search)
r who served with distinction throughout the war. Graves Garnished with garlands. The graves of the dead were elaborately decorated, while the band, under the leadership of Professor Andrew Bowering, discoursed sweet music familiar to every Southern soldier. At the conclusion of the exercises a salute of thirteen guns was fired under the direction of Comrade G. T. Downing, who served in the Army of Northern Virginia in the Milledge artillery of Atlanta, Georgia, Nelson's battalion, Jackson's corps. As the echo of the last gun died away up the valley the sun sank to rest in a bed of gold and crimson clouds, and the heroes who responded to their country's call and followed Lee, Jackson and Stuart, conquering, yet unconquering, and gave their life in the defence of their country, were left alone in their bed of glory, covered with flowers of fidelity wet with the tears of love. The monument unveiled. The monument was erected by the Ladies' Memorial Association of this c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, 272. Coaghenson, Capt., 387. Cobb, Gen. T. R. R., 24. Collin, Hon. C. F., Address of, 149. Confederate Army, Disparity of with the Federal, 130, 306. Confederate Dead, Monuments to, at Fairfax C. H., 120; Helena, Ark., 260; at Jackson, Miss., 293; at Fredericksburg, Va., 397; Distinguished in 1890-91, 92. Confederate Soldier, Tribute to the, 251, 272; as a citizen, 308; Devotion of, 413. Confederate Survivors' Association, Augusta, Ga., 92. Confederate Veterans, United, t to Confederate Dead at, 260. Henderson, Gen. R. J., Death of, 94. Hinton. Capt. Drury A., 8. Hoge, D. D., Rev. Moses D., Remarks of, 146. Holcombe, Lt., 387 Hunter, Gen., David, Vandalism of, 394. Indians as Soldiers, 18. Jackson, Miss., Dedication of Monument to the Confederate Dead at, 293; oration of Hon. E. C. Walthall, 298; description of the monument, 315; history of the Confederate Memorial Association of, 315. Jericho Ford, Battle of, 71, 75. Johnson's Island,