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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 740 208 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 428 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 383 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 366 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 335 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 260 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 250 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 236 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 220 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jackson (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
ng it, with the chemical stores, upon railroad cars, and sending all off, with about twenty-five people, including several women and children, with some food to carry them through the very uncertain time of their transit to Selma. On the whole it is perhaps remarkable that there were so few serious accidents and disasters in dealing with dangerous explosive agents, but there were some such with sad consequences. Quite early in the war there was a destructive explosion in a building at Jackson, Miss., in which small-arms' cartridges were being made, and some fifteen or twenty poor girls were killed, portions of their bodies and clothing being thrown up among the branches of trees standing near. Later a similar accident at Richmond, in one of the shops on an island in James river, due, it was believed, to careless handling of a tray of friction primers, caused the death of a number of women and girls and grievous burning of others. It made a deep impression on the people of the city
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Major Andrew Reid Venable, Jr. [from Richmond, Va., Times-Dispatch.] (search)
ther and at Venable, when the latter said, And now, sir, if I could carry any orders for you, as I see your Adjutant has gone. Thus it was that Stuart, who, on Jackson's fall on the evening of May 2nd, at Chancellorsville, had been put in command of Jackson's Corps, met Venable in the very thickest of the battle of the 3rd day. Jackson's Corps, met Venable in the very thickest of the battle of the 3rd day. Venable had come up to ask his Colonel whether he didn't think a bean ration would be good for the men. He never proposed that momentous question to his Regimental Commander. Stuart, who handled Jackson's Corps on that day with superb skill, came suddenly in the woods upon the conscientious Commissary. They had never seen eaJackson's Corps on that day with superb skill, came suddenly in the woods upon the conscientious Commissary. They had never seen each other since the old St. Louis days, but the recognition was instant. Stuart, who had sent off every staff officer with urgent, and almost inspired, orders, grasped his hand, and said, Venable, I've sent off my last man. You must take this order to the left. There is no one else. I assume all responsibility. Certainly, sir, r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
nizant are embodied in the following pages. Popular interest in the battle of Gettysburg has suffered no abatement from the lapse of time. In popular imagination the shouts of the contending hosts, and the echoes of musketry and artillery still resound through the valleys and linger upon the opposing heights. While the battle is not accounted as sanguinary as Sharpsburg, and not as picturesque in its setting as Fredericksburg, and while there was no brilliant coup de main like that of Jackson's at Chancellorsville, yet, as marking the turning point in the fortunes of the war, and repelling the tide of Southern invasion, it is by common consent regarded as the most momentous of all the struggles waged between the army of the Potomac and the army of Northern Virginia. To the military student of the campaign, the tactical movements on either side, the manner in which the troops were brought into action, the nature of the ground, the strength of the several positions, and how eac