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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 20 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isaeus, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Halicarnassus (Turkey) or search for Halicarnassus (Turkey) in all documents.

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Isaeus, Euphiletus, section hypothesis (search)
(By Dionysius of Halicarnassus) The Deme of Erchia is summoned before the court by one of its members who has been rejected by its vote and who pleads that he is being unjustly disfranchised. A law had been passed by the Athenians ordering that a revision should be made of the lists of citizens according to demes, and that anyone who was rejected by the votes of his fellow-demesmen should no longer enjoy the rights of citizenship; those, however, who were unjustly rejected had the right to appeal to the court by summoning the members of the deme, and, if they were again excluded, they were to be sold as slaves and their property confiscated. It is under this law that Euphiletus, having summoned the demesmen of Erchia on the ground that they had unjustly rejected him, instituted the present case. The facts have been already skilfully set forth and confirmed by witnesses. The following passage, in which the orator seeks to confirm the evidence, is composed, in my opinion, with cons