Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) or search for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Washington or Alexandria, while it was still on the Potomac, at Berlin and Harper's Ferry, General Burnside's order to send it to Washington not having been received were therefore given, on the eleventh June, to withdraw their garrisons to Harper's Ferry, but these orders were not obeyed, and on the thirteenth Winchester was att cutting Meade's line of supplies and capturing his trains. Our force at Harper's Ferry at this time was supposed to be about eleven thousand. It was incorrectly movement upon Middletown. In the mean time General French had reoccupied Harper's Ferry, destroyed the enemy's pontoon train at Williamsport and Falling Waters, ante the crossing of the river. General Meade continued his flank pursuit by Harper's Ferry, Berlin, and Warrenton, till he reached Culpeper Court-House, where he halt must have been heavy, as we captured many prisoners. Troops sent out from Harper's Ferry, forced him to immediately retreat. On the seventh of November, Generals
ly, but I rejoice to say not fatally, wounded in the head. Lieutenant Rivers, I regret to state, is severely wounded in the foot. Another account. Harper's Ferry, Va., January 11, 1864. Mr. Editor: Since the rebel General Early attempted to make that raid down the Shenandoah Valley, but which, you remember, he didn't mpension-bridge over the Shenandoah River, and to guard against any surprise which might be attempted by the guerrillas in Loudon Valley upon our main force in Harper's Ferry. The battalion had gone into winter quarters, and were very comfortably situated. A line of pickets was kept thrown out across the valley, and every one thoble force, is still at Winchester, and that he has gone into winter quarters there. H. E. T. List of killed and wounded. Medical Director's office, Harper's Ferry, Va., January 10, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the following list of killed and wounded in the Independent battalion Maryland cavalry, Major Cole com
as too late and a matter of impossibility to recall the furloughed troops. At the earliest possible moment cavalry, in small detachments, was sent out from Harper's Ferry, Martinsburgh, and Cumberland to gain information of the enemy's whereabouts. The scouting-parties did not bring us in any particularly reliable information,n had been attacked, and that the garrison at Petersburgh was again threatened, General Kelly ordered movements to be made in the most expeditious manner from Harper's Ferry and Martinsburgh. Of Sullivan's troops, a force was sent to Winchester, under the command of Colonel Fitzsimmons. Of Averill's command, (and I must take occ already learned. The enemy succeeded in reaching the railroad and in partially safely getting away, only in consequence of the columns from Martinsburgh and Harper's Ferry having defeated General Kelly's calculation by failing to reach Romney at six P. M. on the evening of the second. It was calculated that this column would be
ishers. The right wing of the skirmish-line was commanded by Colonel Bull, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth, and the left by Lieutenant-Colonel Baird, of the same regiment, and here it is but just to state that the latter officer won the highest commendation from General Hayes and other general officers for an exhibition of gallantry seldom witnessed on the battle-field. Colonel Bull, it will be remembered, was dismissed for misbehavior in presence of the enemy at the surrender of Harper's Ferry. Assured of his innocence of the charge of cowardice, he was afterward reinstated by the President, and by the Governor of his State promoted from Major to Lieutenant-Colonel--the position which he now holds in his old regiment. Those of his regiment instrumental in his dismissal, are now ready to testify to his merit as a gallant soldier. At twelve M., Colonel Carroll, commanding the First brigade of General Hayes's division, crossed to the support of the Third, and at five P. M., Co