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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
libre 54, known as Mississippi rifles, except those at Richmond, taken from Harper's Ferry, which were calibre 58; the muskets were the old flint-lock, calibre 69, al with sword bayonet, and the rifle-musket model of 1855, had been seized at Harper's Ferry by the State of Virginia. That for the rifle-musket was being transferred at Savannah, fighting with a command composed of his own operatives.) from Harper's Ferry. There were no private armories at the South; nor was there any inducementith three grooves, after the manner of Parrott. The army in observation at Harper's Ferry, and that at Manassas, were supplied with old batteries of six-pounder gunsther points. The State of Virginia claimed all the machinery captured at Harper's Ferry, and was bringing it all to Richmond. It was agreed, however, with the Stacture of arms was to find an iron fit for the barrels. The skelps found at Harper's Ferry served for awhile, and when these were exhausted Colonel Burton selected an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Small arms. (search)
000 Mount Vernon Arsenal, Alabama2,000 20,000 Baton Rouge Arsenal, Louisiana2,00027,000 —–—– 15,000120,000 There were at Richmond about 60, 000 old, worthless flint muskets, and at Baton Rouge about 10,000 old Hall's rifles and carbines. Besides the foregoing, there were at Little Rock, Ark., a few thousand stands, and some few at the Texas arsenals, increasing the aggregate of serviceable arms to, say, 143,000. To these must be added the arms owned by the several States and by military organizations throughout the country, giving, say, 150,000 in all for the use of the armies of the Confederacy. The rifles were of the calibre 54, known as Mississippi rifles, except those at Richmond, taken from Harper's Ferry, which were calibre 58; the muskets were the old flint-lock, calibre 69, altered to percussion. Of sabres there were a few boxes at each arsenal, and some short artillery swords. A few hundred holster pistols were scattered here and there. There were no re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
hine, and other valuable information. The sets of machinery for making the rifle with sword bayonet, and the rifle-musket model of 1855, had been seized at Harper's Ferry by the State of Virginia. That for the rifle-musket was being transferred by the State to her ancient armory at Richmond, under the direction of Lieutenant-ho succeeded in producing a good service arm. He was finally killed in the trenches at Savannah, fighting with a command composed of his own operatives.) from Harper's Ferry. There were no private armories at the South; nor was there any inducement, prior to the war, to turn capital in that direction. Thus, the class of skilled our-pounder iron guns, which were reamed out to get a good bore, and were rifled with three grooves, after the manner of Parrott. The army in observation at Harper's Ferry, and that at Manassas, were supplied with old batteries of six-pounder guns and twelve-pounder Howitzers. A few Parrott guns purchased by the State of Virgin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Armories and small arms. (search)
mall arms. Besides the Arsenals, a brief account of which has just been given, we had the armories at Richmond and Fayetteville, N. C.; and arms were also made at other points. The State of Virginia claimed all the machinery captured at Harper's Ferry, and was bringing it all to Richmond. It was agreed, however, with the State of North Carolina, that that part of the machinery which was specially adapted to make the Mississippi rifle (calibre 54) should go to Fayetteville, where there wasor it at Macon. Peace would have then found us in possession of a great armory, which I much desired. One of the earliest difficulties forced upon us in the manufacture of arms was to find an iron fit for the barrels. The skelps found at Harper's Ferry served for awhile, and when these were exhausted Colonel Burton selected an iron produced at a forge in Patrick county, Va., and by placing a skilled workman over the rolling process at the Tredegar Works he soon produced skelps with which h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? (search)
ibed as not a mere act of Congress which could be repealed, * * * but a solemn compact between the inhabitants of the Territory * * * and the people of the thirteen States. The next sentences (p. 268) contain the only allusion to John Brown in the text, and are as follows: The excitement became greater when John Brown, formerly of Kansas, actually invaded the State of Virginia with a party of about twenty men, for the purpose of liberating slaves. He gained possession of the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, thinking to arm the negroes, whom he expected to join him. He was easily captured—his party being either killed or dispersed—and was tried, convicted, and put to death under the laws of Virginia. Invaded the State of Virginia is good! We hear nothing, however, of Booth and his accomplices invading Washington, and attacking President Lincoln and Secretary Seward. They are murderers. Contrast with this description of John Brown the following, on page 276, which the author adopts fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
as, says Colonel Roman, General Beauregard's plan of operations, who commanded at that locality, was based, as were all his military plans, on the leading ideas of concentration and aggression. That plan was, that General J. E. Johnston, at Harper's Ferry, who was confronting General Patterson, and that General Holmes, who was confronting nobody, should join their forces to his own at Manassas, thus making an effective force of 40,000 men. This force, wrote General Beauregard to Johnston, woul been much superior in numbers and equipment to the attacking party). Then we could go back with as many men as necessary to attack and disperse General Patterson's army before he could know positively what had become of you (Patterson was at Harper's Ferry). We would then proceed to General McClellan's theatre of war, and treat him likewise, after which we would pass over into Maryland, to operate in rear of Washington. I think this whole campaign could be completed brilliantly in from fifteen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
rederick county, Maryland, and those about Harpers Ferry and Williamsport. After several hours theember 16th, the day after the surrender of Harpers Ferry, he again telegraphed: I think, however, yd of Blue Ridge, known as Loudoun Heights. Harpers Ferry is, of itself, a cul de sac, indefensible e stationed at Winchester, Martinsburg and Harpers Ferry. After he had crossed, he was informed ththat when he relied upon the evacuation of Harpers Ferry he found that he was entirely mistaken in s and Jackson, completed the investment of Harpers Ferry. Halleck and Stanton were telegraphing ial there. Frederick is twenty miles from Harpers Ferry. Stuart, on leaving Frederick, sent instrmoved up the road from Charlestown towards Harpers Ferry. At day-light the circle of fire blazed oextraordinary. He had heard the firing at Harpers Ferry and was advised of the surrender that mornenants. Miles hoisted the white flag at Harpers Ferry at 8 o'clock A. M. on the 15th. Jackson[29 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
& Johnston, Richmond) this exceedingly entertaining narrative of a gallant and distinguished soldier who has shown that he can wield the pen with as much facility as the sword. It is a gossipy, interesting book about men and things, and while we cannot, of course, accept all of the author's opinions, yet we are pleased with the kindly tone in which he speaks of many of our Confederate leaders. E. g., he says of Stonewall Jackson: The conduct of Jackson's campaign, in 1862, between Harpers Ferry and Richmond, justifies any measure of praise. He pays General Lee the following tribute: The whole civilized world has reviewed the career of General Lee. The qualities of his mind and disposition have been recognized and extolled, and his fate has excited the tenderest sympathy in millions of hearts. A character like that of Robert E. Lee could not possibly be found in any human society in which the laws and public opinion do not sanction and approve of marked distinctions of r