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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
ed by me before the survivors of the Twelfth regiment at Walhalla, S. C., on Gregg's brigade at Manassas (see Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XIII, p. 1), it is stated that the First South Carolina volunteers was guided into the action by Lieutenant Fellows, of the Thirteenth. I am assured by Captain J. A. Hinnant, of the Twelfth, that the statement is a mistake, that it was he who did so, and I make this correction at his request.—E. McC., Jr. Then followed the capture of Harper's Ferry and the battle of Sharpsburg, in which the Twelfth sustained the irreparable loss of Colonel Barnes, and in which Captains J. L. Miller and H. C. Davis and Lieutenant R. M. Kerr were wounded. The Twelfth lost 102 of the 163 killed and wounded in the whole brigade. It was more fortunate at Shepherdstown, in which it had but one wounded, and scarcely less so at Fredericksburg, where it lost but eight out of the 336 killed and wounded in the brigade. A most gallant young officer from Fai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Statement of Captain Milton Rouse in regard to the charge that he violated his parole. (search)
of the Rebellion, there is a report of a United States Military Commission appointed to enquire into the surrender of Harpers Ferry. In that report I am charged by several witnesses as having violated my parole. As this book is a government officie in Bolivar, flanked the pickets near the Potomac, and was recaptured about midnight near Halltown. On my return to Harpers Ferry Colonel Davis was furious, and after using very insulting language ordered me to be confined in the guard-house. He and sent me through his pickets to Charlestown, returning me the horse and buggy. The night before the surrender of Harpers Ferry, my brother William and I were at Mr. Gardner's, and on the next morning we went together across the fields to see thmembers of my company. One of these, Mr. John S. Easterday, offered me his horse, which I accepted, and rode down to Harpers Ferry alone and unarmed. I did not pass through Bolivar, but by way of the Shenandoah, and remained unarmed during the day
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Narrative of the service of Colonel Geo. A. Porterfield in Northwestern Virginia in 1861-1861, (search)
ld inform them of my situation and the condition of the country around me. I had then at Grafton about seven hundred and fifty men. I knew that I could get but little if any additional force. I was informed that no aid could be expected from Harpers Ferry. My command was deficiently supplied in every respect. There had been sent me a few boxes of flint-lock rifles and some old muskets from the arsenal at Lexington, two kegs of powder and some lead; that was all. A considerable United States commit such an act of war against citizens of Maryland, when we were receiving aid from the State then and hoping for its accession to the Confederacy. General Lee writes to General J. E. Johnston, June 7, 1861: The evacuation of the latter (Harpers Ferry) would interrupt our communication with Maryland and injure our cause in that State. These extracts prove that the Confederacy hoped to hold the Baltimore & Ohio road at that early period, hence the delay in ordering and preparing for its
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Field Telegrams from around Petersburg, Virginia. (search)
owing dispatch by signal, via Dunn's House, to General Beauregard: General G. T. Beauregard: Have felt enemy in my front, and discovered force all prepared on my line. Geo. E. Pickett, Major-General. An answer will be sent you by signals, which will be unintelligible to you. Take no notice of it. W. H. Taylor, A. A. G. Petersburg, Va., 25th August, 1864. Honorable Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.. General Early reports from Charleston that he has forced the enemy back to Harpers Ferry. R. E. Lee. Petersburg, Va. 27th August, 1864. Hon. Jas. A. Seddon, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.: General Archer is on duty with his brigade. Officers capable of duty cannot be spared. Generals H. H. Walker at Savannah, and A. L. Long at Lynchburg, at present incapacitated for field service, might be available for a court. General J. G. Martin with Holmes also. R. E. Lee. Petersburg, Va., 28th August, 1864. Governor Wm. Smith, Richmond. My telegram of the 26th, asking
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), My comrades of the army of Northern Virginia, (search)
es to assist, and frequently everything had to be done by the department and the army. During the winter men from General Lee's army cut the timber and shipped it to Richmond, with which artillery carriages were made on which to mount the guns to fight the battles in the spring. Men followed the army and collected the hides of the slaughtered animals, with which to cover the saddle-trees made of timber cut by details from the men in the field. The out-put of the army, brought from Harpers Ferry to Richmond, was wholly inadequate. Our arms were of foreign importation somewhat, but mostly captured from the enemy. At the close of the war the Richmond arsenal, the main one in the Confederacy, could not have armed five thousand troops. To make nitre a special bureau was organized; and on a large scale, throughout the Confederacy, artificial nitre beds were early formed, and an abundant supply was furnished with which to manufacture gunpowder. The large arsenal at Augusta, G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second Virginia regiment of cavalry, C. S. A. a tribute to its discipline and efficiency, and defiant Resolutions passed by it February 28th, 1865. (search)
viction of Captain John Brown, known as Old Brown of Ossawatomi, with a full account of the Attempted Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, Compiled from Official and Authentic Sources. New York: R. M. Dewitt. See also a Report of Colonel R. E. Lee to thut of the agitation of the slavery question. In August, 1859, he began his operations to take possession of Harper's Ferry, in Virginia, with the avowed purpose of freeing the slaves. There was an arsenal there, and a large number of guns storedn stated that he expected large reinforcements. On the 16th of October, with eighteen of his men, he proceeded to Harper's Ferry, broke down the Armory gate, and overpowered the watchman on duty. By midnight he had distributed his men as patrolmmilitia companies had also assembled. Under guard of a detachment of the marines the prisoners were transferred from Harper's Ferry for trial by the Circuit Court at Charlestown, over which Judge Richard Parker presided. Brown's avowed object was t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
viction of Captain John Brown, known as Old Brown of Ossawatomi, with a full account of the Attempted Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, Compiled from Official and Authentic Sources. New York: R. M. Dewitt. See also a Report of Colonel R. E. Lee to thut of the agitation of the slavery question. In August, 1859, he began his operations to take possession of Harper's Ferry, in Virginia, with the avowed purpose of freeing the slaves. There was an arsenal there, and a large number of guns storedn stated that he expected large reinforcements. On the 16th of October, with eighteen of his men, he proceeded to Harper's Ferry, broke down the Armory gate, and overpowered the watchman on duty. By midnight he had distributed his men as patrolmmilitia companies had also assembled. Under guard of a detachment of the marines the prisoners were transferred from Harper's Ferry for trial by the Circuit Court at Charlestown, over which Judge Richard Parker presided. Brown's avowed object was t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes by General H. L. Benning on battle of Sharpsburg. (search)
rigade. The rest of the division was immediately under General Jones. Two regiments of Toombs's brigade, Fifteenth and Seventeenth, and the five companies of Eleventh Georgia, had been sent off after the enemy's cavalry that had escaped from Harpers Ferry, so he was reduced to the Second and Twentieth Georgia under my command, the former having about 120 or 130 men and officers, and the latter about 220 or 230, and to Kearse's regiment, Fiftieth Georgia, consisting of from 130 to 150. Besidescavalry, worn down by marching day and night. I took command of them, and was ordered by Toombs to place them behind a stone fence far to the right of the road from the bridge, and stay there till relieved by some of A. P. Hill's troops from Harpers Ferry. In about two hours General Gregg came and relieved us, and then we started to the rear to rest, as we had been informed we should. As we moved off we saw the enemy's lines, one after another, advancing from the bridge on our lines that h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Hammond, Capt. T. L., killed, 191. Hampden, 112. Hampton, Anthony, 13. Hampton, Edward, 13. Hampton, John, 13. Hampton, Richard, 13. Hampton, Wade, 13, 94, 226, 262, 274. Hampton Roads Conference, 320. Hancock, Gen. W. S., 30, 48, 264. Hancock, Md., 90. Hanging Rock, Battle of, 5, 9, 10, 17, 30, 32. Hanna, 9. Hansbrough, Col., 88, 90. Harden, Capt. O., 15. Hare's Hill, 401, 410. Hardie, Gen. W. J., 131, 301, 309. 368. Harding, 359. Harman, Major, M. G., 87. Harpers Ferry, 20, 85, 268. Harper's History of the Rebellion, deprecated, 30, 31. Harris, Lt., Chas., 59. Harris, Col., 377. Harris, Col. D. B., 116. Harris, Gov. Isham G., 274, 352, 386. Harris, Hon. W. P., 275. Harrison, Miss, Belle, 93. Harrison, Lt., Geo. E., 92. Harrison, Capt. J. R, 15 Hartford Convention, 334, 434. Harvey, Lt., 401. Hastings, Battle of, 202. Haskell, Capt. W. T., 21. Hatch, 105. Hatch, Col., 82. Hatcher's Run, 260. Havelock, 203. Hawes, Gen., Ric