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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
period of seventy days. This event was the culmination of a quarrel of long standing between Jefferson Davis and General Johnston. Although maintained with a sort of stilted dignity calculated and doubtless intended to deceive the outside world, beneath all it was the deepest, bitterest personal feud of the war, and, like most antagonisms in high place, was apparently without adequate cause. There never was any real concord between the two men from the day Johnston assumed command at Harper's Ferry, May 23, 1861, until the war closed with Davis' flight and Johnston's surrender at Durham's station, April 26, 1865. Many of the misfortunes of the Confederacy can be directly traced to the hostility between Davis and Johnston, and no doubt their dissentions were of direct and material benefit to the North. It must be true that many things were done and many other things left undone by both which would have been otherwise but for their eternal controversies. Their estrangement had i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
he said that with the force at General Lee's disposal the line fronting Richmond and Petersburg could not be held, and yet our great commander held them for nine long months. When the lines were broken General Hill's prediction was verified, he paid the forfeit with his life. Whenever the Army of Northern Virginia was in fearful peril it was General Hill's fate to hold the post of danger. At Sharpsburg, where all seemed lost, he marched the eighteen miles, crossing the Potomac from Harper's Ferry, which had surrendered to him, and struck Burnside's corpse of fifteen thousand men and rolled it up like a scroll. When the army retired across the Potomac his division formed the rear guard, and when the Federal army attempted to follow at Boetner's Ford, he filled the Potomac with their dead. After Gettysburg, having gained the only success there, in the destruction of Reynolds' corps, killing the corps commander opposed to him. His third corps formed again the rear guard of the A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
crossed the Potomac into Virginia. General McClellan had on and near this battlefield 87,164 troops, and General Lee had 40,000. (See Battles and Leaders, Vol. II, p. 603.) In the eighteen days of the Maryland campaign, which includes Harper's Ferry, Lee's army, never larger than 40,000, fought the battles of South Mountain, Crampton's Gap, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg (Antietam), and Shepherdstown, losing in killed, wounded and captured, 11,172; while McClellan, with an army of 87,000, loHarper's Ferry, Sharpsburg (Antietam), and Shepherdstown, losing in killed, wounded and captured, 11,172; while McClellan, with an army of 87,000, lost, killed, 2,662; wounded, 11,719; captured, 13,494, a total of 27,875. (See Vol. 1, p. 810, for Confederate loss, and the same volume for Federal loss.) Lee retires his army to Fredericksburg, on the south bank of the Rappahannock, and McClellan moves his army to the other side. Both armies go into winter-quarters. McClellan's head, like Pope's, has fallen under the official axe of the War Department, and Burnside is now the commander. Burnside's army crossed on pontoons and made severa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the monument to the Richmond Howitzers (search)
ll on a certain occasion, The Lord hath delivered them into our hands. Public opinion had as yet experienced no violent displacement as to the merchantable quality of negroes; for the very States in which slavery itself had ceased, or was ceasing to exist, were those most actively engaged in the traffic in slaves. A dispatch from Hartford, Connecticut, to the Boston Herald says: Many of Connecticut's old-time Abolitionists have greeted Jason Brown, son of John Brown, the martyr of Harper's Ferry, who has been visiting here for two or three days past. * * In referring to the slavery question he gives this significant opinion: I believe that slavery was a sectional evil, and that the people of the North were as much to blame for its long continuance as the people of the South. Why? Because the old slave States of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and Pennsylvania, when they found slavery no longer profitable, sold their slaves to other people of the South and po
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ust passed his majority, who brought her to his home in Norfolk, a typical ancestral homestead, where beside the white folks there was quite a colony of family servants from the pickaninny just able to crawl to the old grey headed mammy who had nursed ole massa. She soon became enamoured of her surroundings and charmed with the devotion of her colored maid, whose sole duty it was to wait upon her young missis. When the John Brown raid burst upon the South and her husband was ordered to Harper's Ferry, there was not a more indignant matron in all Virginia, and when at last secession came, the South did not contain a more enthusiastic little rebel. On the 15th of May, 1862, a few days after the surrender of Norfolk to the Federals, by her father-in-law, then mayor, amid the excitement attending a captured city, her son Willie was born. Cut off from her husband and subjected to the privations and annoyances incident to a subjugated community, her father insisted upon her coming with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
ys does exactly what I tell it. And General Early said: They can do more hard fighting and be in better plight afterwards than any troops I ever saw. From Harper's Ferry to Appomattox this splendid body of men carried the battle-flag of their regiment into every battle fought by Lee and Jackson, and never failed. To the last,f victory, and wreathing new chaplets of glory for its commander. Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor, Frazer's Farm, Slaughter's Mountain, Second Manassas, Ox Hill, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Boteller's Ford, Castleman's Ferry, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, besides many combats and skirmishes of less noteā€”all fought in the short spon was in the fore-front of the battle; and contributed largely to the success of the movements of Jackson's corps. At Sharpsburg General Hill's march from Harper's Ferry, his timely arrival upon the field, his prompt and vigorous assault upon the victorious columns of McClellan saved the Army of Northern Virginia from a seriou