Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) or search for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
And what are his qualifications for this important position? It required all of the powers of the Lexington delegation and the influence of Governor Letcher to secure his confirmation by the convention. He was soon sent to the command of Harper's Ferry, then popularly regarded as one of the strongholds of the Confederacy, and those of us who were stationed there eagerly inquired, What is this newly made colonel? Some of the Lexington soldiers, and some of the old cadets, sneered at his Military Academies of England and Germany as an example of able strategy, rapid marching, and heroic fighting. In his march from the Valley to seven days around Richmond, his flank movement to Pope's rear at Second Manassas—his capture of Harper's Ferry, and march to Sharpsburg—his march from the Valley to Fredericksburg—and his last great flank movement to Hooker's rear at Chancellorsville, Jackson showed the same rapidity of movement. An able critic said of him, he moved infantry with t<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Demonstration on Harpers Ferry, from the Times-dispatch, December 9, 1906. (search)
Demonstration on Harpers Ferry, from the Times-dispatch, December 9, 1906. May 29, 1862—How Jackson Eluded Fremont and won three fights in four Days—Scouting in the Darkness—Famous Valley campaign of 1862— well—laid plans that worked well. During the last week of May, 1862, my regiment, the 2nd Virginia Cavalry, commanded by Colonel T. T. Munford (afterward General Munford) was doing duty around Bolivar Heights, near Harper's Ferry. During the night of May 29th I was aroused bHarper's Ferry. During the night of May 29th I was aroused by Colonel Munford, who ordered me to take my company (Company B, the Wise Troop, of Lynchburg), and move down the pike to the neighborhood of Halltown, which is near the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to establish a picket. As I was entirely ignorant of the country, having come there in the night, the colonel proceeded by the light of a Confederate candle to outline the route he wished me to take with pencil on a small piece of paper. He directed me to pass our infantry pickets, and not to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.68 (search)
were alive, they could and would give a good account; but I will try and do the best that I can, and tell what I saw and did from my standpoint, which was not very far right or left of our colors. Bob Forrest was the color-bearer. John Cose, of Company I, was on his right front rank, and I was on his left front rank. Captain Octavius Coke, of Company C, on my left. Our brigade (Semmes') left Maryland Heights on the afternoon of the 16th of September, 1862. We crossed the river at Harper's Ferry on pontoon bridges. Late in the day saw plenty of Federal prisoners. I got a good supply of crackers and maple sugar. We camped just outside of the town, and rations were issued with instructions to cook at once. It was then about dark. We marched until about 10 o'clock, and then filed off into an open field to rest for the night, as I thought. Most of us lay on the ground to sleep and rest, but many, as usual, went off foraging for something good to eat. At about 12 o'clock, I re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), In Memoriam. (search)
promptly gave allegiance to the South, enlisting in F Company, of Richmond, Va.; promoted to the rank of lieutenant, he was assigned to the C. S. Navy, and for daring service therein was further promoted to the rank of major of the 24th Virginia Infantry, and surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse with the rank of colonel. Since the war he has been a successful practitioner of law at Richmond, Va. Wilfred E. Cutshaw, Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery Confederate States Army; born at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., January 25, 1838; died at Richmond, Va., December 19, 1907; of sturdy Scotch and steadfast English blood—his mother being Martha J. Moxley, born in Alexandria, and who died at the age of ninety-two years. He served with conspicuous valor and efficiency in the C. S. Artillery, losing a leg and receiving other wounds. In September, 1866, he was appointed Assistant Professor of Mathematics in the Virginia Military Institute, a post once held by Major, subsequently, General T. J. Ja
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
of, 269 Graham's Battery, Capt. Edward, 12 Hammond, W. S..69 Hampton, Col. Frank T. 153 Hampton and Reconstruction Work, 183 Hanover Grays, Co. I, 15th Virginia, Roll of and Deaths in 363 Hanson's Command, Col. Chas. H. 273 Harper's Ferry, Jackson's Demonstration on, 241 Harrison, Jr., Gen. Paul, 66 Hartsville, Tenn., Battle of 262 Haskells of S. C., Remarkable Record of, 151 Henderson Judge Don E., 185 Hickman, Capt., Wm. Lewis, 279 Hood's Texas Brigade Fame of,Bride, 146 Hutchinson Miss Mary. 303 Hunter Major Robert W.. 132 Hutter, Col., J. Risque, 857 Jackson, Capt. John H., 280 Jackson, Gen. T. J. Career of, 79 How he was called Stonewall, 80 Valley Campaign of, 82 Demonstration on Harpers' Ferry, 341 At Chancellorsville 87 Severe discipline of 89 Fatal wounding of 96 Valentine's statue of, 97 Johnson, Col. Adam R., 111 Johnston, Gen., Albert Sydney, killed, 214 Johnston, Miss, Mary, 29 Jones, Col. John M., 84 Jones, Dr.,