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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. (search)
oanoke Island and other points in the sounds of North Carolina. Fifty-three of them were mounted at Port Royal, others at Fernandina and at the defences of New Orleans. They were met with at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Island No.10, Memphis, Vicksburg, Grand Gulf and Port Hudson. We found them up the Red River as far as the gunboats penetrated, and took possession of some of them on the cars at Duvall's Bluff, on White River, bound for Little Rock. They gave us a three hours hard fight at Arkansas Post, but in the end they all returned to their rightful owners, many of them indented with Union shot and not a few permanently disabled. Had it not been for the guns captured at Norfolk and Pensacola, the Confederates would have found it a difficult matter to arm their fortifications for at least a year after the breaking out of hostilities, at the expiration of which time they began to manufacture their own ordnance, and import it from abroad. Great as was, therefore, the loss of our
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
upport of the Navy, but rather the fault of the military historians, who in almost all cases ignored the Navy altogether. Did the limits of this paper permit, and could the numerous cases of support to the Army be specially noted, it would readily be seen that in the Sounds of North Carolina, under Goldsborough, in the rivers, bayous and inlets along the Southern coast under Dupont, on the coast of Louisiana and Texas and the whole length of the Mississippi, Tennessee, Cumberland, White, Arkansas and Red Rivers, a distance of over 3,000 miles, the Navy more or less contributed towards success; and if defeat overtook our Armies at any time while the Navy was at hand, the enemy gained no important or lasting advantage. Our Army always had a line of defense (the naval gun-boats) on which they could fall back, regain its formation and send the enemy retreating in his turn. For the present we must leave the sounds and inlets and follow other adventures. All the sounds of North Carol
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
rs were opened to national vessels for hundreds of miles. Nashville, the capital of Tennessee and a place of great strategic importance, fell. Bowling Green had become untenable as soon as Donelson was attacked, and was abandoned on the 14th of February, the day before the Confederate works on the Cumberland were carried, while Columbus and the other end of the strategic line were evacuated early in March, thus leaving the Mississippi river free from the Confederate flag from St. Louis to Arkansas. The news of this victory was very encouraging to the Union people, especially when they beheld its results. When city after city fell and stronghold after stronghold was abandoned, and they saw that it was all in consequence of the capture of Fort Donelson, it is not strange that the national amazement and gratification knew no bounds, and it is only to be regretted that the Navy should not have had a greater share in the honors. Grant was made a Major-General, and we only regret th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
ack on Haines' Bluff by the United States steamer Benton, etc., and death of Lieut.-Com. Gwinn. arrival of General McClernand to relieve Sherman. expedition to Arkansas post. last act of the Navy in the Yazoo. vessels that took part in the Yazoo expedition. Rear-Admiral Porter took command of the Mississippi Squadron in Octher operations and at once proposed that Vicksburg should be given up for the present, and as his troops were somewhat demoralized he must go with them to attack Arkansas Post and secure a success which would impart new confidence to them. He desired the admiral to go along with the gun-boats, and this being agreed to, preparationder Army rule and knew exactly the terms on which General McClernand had received his orders, he declined to have anything to do with the proposed expedition to Arkansas Post, unless General Sherman should go in command of the troops. To this McClernand agreed, only stipulating that he should accompany the expedition. So the ma
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
Arrival of the expedition. the Army in the rear of Arkansas post. plan of the fort. the gun-boats in position. theumes command of all the forces. The expedition against Arkansas Post arrived at a point four miles below the enemy's work Fifteen miles had to be marched over before the back of Arkansas Post could be reached, and the major part of the night wa and use their howitzers as circumstances would admit. Arkansas Post was a large, well constructed fort built with the bed by the enemy on hearing of the capture of Fort Hindman (Arkansas Post). General McClernand assumed all the direction ofer. General Grant did not approve of this movement on Arkansas Post when he first heard of it, as he thought it improperiscouraging defeat, he became reconciled to the attack on Arkansas Post, though it was a side movement and could in no way c overthrow of Vicksburg. Certain it is, the success at Arkansas Post had a most exhilarating effect on the troops, and th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
ient in all the many appliances for undertaking a siege. They had but four siege guns, and three were supplied by the Navy. Their position opposite Vicksburg was such a poor one that a sudden rise of water would have drowned them out; and, worst of all, they had a leader in whom not an officer of the expedition could put any confidence. McClernand had come to supersede Sherman in the Yazoo River just after the troops had fallen back to the transports, and he had accompanied the Army to Arkansas Post, but with the express understanding with Admiral Porter that he would not interfere with General Sherman. This he refrained from doing until the enemy was beaten, and at that moment he assumed command and made all the reports himself. There were splendid generals in that Army, all men of the highest military acquirements, such as Sherman, McPherson, Steele and Smith, who now saw placed at their head an officer who had not only no qualifications for managing an Army of such a size,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
f long and rapid marches. In the latter part of June, Admiral Porter received information from deserters that General Price was moving with a large force from Arkansas towards the Mississippi, intending to unite with other troops near Vicksburg to operate along the river. The Admiral immediately made arrangements to meet this d to Command the Lexington. sister-ship to the Taylor, and one of the gun-boats that had braved the storm of battle at Belmont, Shiloh, Fort Henry, Donelson and Arkansas Post. The Confederates were again assembling in White River, where it was easy for them to get from Little Rock. Arkansas, and escape back again if attacked. Arkansas, and escape back again if attacked. Lieutenant-Commander Bache was ordered up White River to suppress these raiders, whose zeal and persistency seemed without limit. The great Confederate armies of the West appeared to have been divided into small bodies, which could move with greater celerity. The Lexington, Cricket and Marmora were the vessels comprising Lieute
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
d its levees with the splendid steamers that formerly kept their storehouses supplied with the products of the Upper Mississippi. But war had made sad ravages in this class of vessels; hundreds of them had been sunk or burned in the Red, Yazoo, Arkansas and White Rivers, and the few that now came creeping out of the bayous and small streams where they had been laid away, were in so dilapidated a condition that on their appearance at the levee, the very sight of these vessels called to mind the belonged to his successor to see that the enemy built no more forts along the banks of the great river; to guarantee a safe passage to army transports and commercial steamers, and to see that no provisions or troops reached the Confederates from Arkansas, Louisiana or Texas. These duties were faithfully performed. The tin-clads and gun-boats, now amounting to about 112, were spread along the whole length of the river (below Vicksburg) and at or near the mouth of all tributaries. The vessels
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
r, had been actively engaged in the work of suppressing the Rebellion, and co-operated zealously with the Army whenever its services were needed. The capture of Arkansas Post, on the Arkansas River, and the constant effective attacks on the batteries of Vicksburg, the bombardment of the city and its defences, the battle of Grand edition of Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. On the right bank of the Mississippi scenes of interest were enacted by the hardy sailors and boatmen in the rivers of Arkansas and northern Louisiana. The Cumberland and Tennessee have been actively patrolled by our vigilant and skillful naval officers; and the exciting chase of Morgan,se waters, where we now have a squadron of 100 vessels, carrying 452 guns, with crews amounting, in the aggregate, to about 5,500 men. Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas, the upper portions of Mississippi and Louisiana, and the southern portions of those States which border on the Ohio River on the north, have been relieved and l
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
was determined to start on this expedition regardless of consequences, Admiral Porter resolved to do every thing in his power to assist his military operations. To make his success certain, General Halleck had determined to send an army into Arkansas under General Steele. This force reached Little Rock early in March, and, after providing themselves with stores and munitions of war. departed from that place on the 24th. and, after a hard march, arrived at Arkadelphia. March 29th, where, fpoor figure beside Banks' well-equipped troops; but when it came to actual warfare, they were famous fighters. They were men who had lain for months in the trenches at Vicksburg, had gone through the hardships of Chickasaw Bayou, had helped win Arkansas Post, etc., etc.; yet when Banks first saw these veterans, he exclaimed, What, in the name of Heaven, did Sherman send me these ragged guerillas for? At Mansfield he found these ragged guerillas saved the day and the honor of his army! We ha
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