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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The race problem in the South—Was the Fifteenth Amendment a mistake? (search)
l contain 60,000,000 of negroes. The census of 1880 gave Mississippi a white population of 479,000 and a negro population of 650,000. It gave South Carolina a white population of 391,000 and a negro population of 604,000, or about two to one. It gave Louisiana 454,000 white population and 483,000 negro population. The census of 1890 will probably show that the negro population outnumbers the whites in Alabama, Georgia and Florida. Ten years later, or the year 9000, will find Virginia, Arkansas and North Carolina with a negro population that outnumbers the whites. Thus, in ten years hence, upon a free ballot and a fair count, we will find nine states of this Union ruled by its ex-slaves, its unlettered property-holders, while its intelligent property-holders will be in a hopeless minority. Let us prove ourselves worthy. The white element of the South is almost exclusively AngloAmeri-can. The mother country encouraged and fostered slavery in her colonies, and the English co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
of our Revolution point to the remedy—a separation. * * * It must begin in South Carolina. The proposition would be welcomed in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, and could we doubt of Louisiana and Texas? But Virginia must be associated. * * * Arkansas, Tennessee and North Carolina would follow of course, and Florida of necessity. Again, in 1811, when Louisiana knocked at the door of the Union for admission as a State, Josiah Quincy, of Massachusetts, said upon the floor of Congress, If thiected sectional President of the United States dons the robes of office a new nation has been born, whose life of storm and tragic death will always present one of the most heroic pictures on history's titled page. North Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas soon cast in their lot with the new Confederacy, followed at last, when all her efforts for a peaceable settlement had failed, by the great mother of statesmen and Presidents, of States and of the Federal Union itself. Thus closed the first epo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life, services and character of Jefferson Davis. (search)
may bring disaster on every portion of our country; and if you will have it thus, we will invoke the God of our fathers who delivered them from the power of the Lion to protect us from the ravages of the Bear, and thus putting our trust in God, and in our firm hearts and strong arms we will vindicate the right as best we may. Secession and Virginia. Well was that pledge redeemed. South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, and North Carolina, Arkansas, and Tennessee, all seceded, while Kentucky, Missouri and Maryland were divided in sentiment. Jefferson Davis became by unanimous selection President of the Confederate States of America; the capital, first planted at Montgomery, was removed here to Richmond, and for four years the new republic waged for its life the mightiest warfare of modern times. There was something melancholy and grand, says a Northern historian, in the motives that caused Virginia at last to make common cause with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Georgia Infantry. (search)
lexander's Tennessee cavalry. 44th regiment Virginia volunteers, Bath cavalry. 52d regiment Virginia volunteers, Anderson's battery. 58th regiment Virginia volunteers, Rice's battery. Third brigade, Colonel William Gilham. 21st regiment Virginia volunteers. 42d regiment Virginia volunteers. 48th regiment Virginia volunteers. 1st battalion Provisional army. Hampden artillery. Fourth brigade, Colonel [ W. B.] Taliaferro. 1st regiment Georgia volunteers. 3d regiment Arkansas volunteers. 23d regiment Virginia volunteers. 37th regiment Virginia volunteers. Returns for the month of December will be made agreeably to this organization. By command of Brigadier-General W. W. Loring. C. L. Stevenson, A. A. General. headquarters Second Artillery Battalion, 17th October, 1862. E. Willis, Acting Chief of Artillery: The guns under Colonel Brown's command at present are as follows: 1. Captain Hupp's battery, consisting of two 6-pounders and two 12-pound
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
, about the causes of secession, the discussion occurring, curiously enough, after the act of secession had been consummated. If we now turn to the border slave States we shall find a marked difference of opinion and feeling. The people of Arkansas voted on the 16th of January, 1861, on the proposition to call a convention to decide upon the subject of secession. It was determined to hold a convention by a vote of 27,412 for and 15,826 against the measure, out of a voting population of 54Supreme Court of the United States, and the others were so vague that the border States themselves might be embraced within their scope. Their resolution was quickly taken upon the question thus suddenly forced upon them. The convention of Arkansas, which on the 18th of March had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39, assembled again on the 6th of May and passed that ordinance by a vote of 69 to 1. In North Carolina, which had refused in February to call a con
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ria, Mrs. Senator Hearst of California, Mrs. Peyton Wise, Colonel Hemphill of South Carolina, General Bradley T. Johnson of Maryland, Congressman Breckinridge of Arkansas, Honorable Thomas G. Skinner of North Carolina, Colonel C. O'B. Cowardin of Virginia, Colonel Gregory of the Stonewall brigade, Colonel L. Daingerfield Lewis of North Carolina, Governor Fleming of West Virginia, Governor Richardson of South Carolina, Governor Fleming of Florida, Senator Pasco of Florida, Senator Berry of Arkansas, Congressman Blanchard of Louisiana, Hon. Mr. Yodo of Ohio, Senator Kenna of West Virginia, Congressman Wilson of Missouri, Congressman Wilson of West Virginia, as conquering heroes they come to do honor to their older brother, and to challenge the world in all its ages to produce a grander man than Robert Edward Lee. Arkansas is here with her gallant sons, among whom is her distinguished Senator Berry, who lost a limb in our service. Tennessee, Kentucky, Maryland, and West Virginia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] (search)
hese their unreturning brave have reared this monument not alone to those who called Virginia mother, but to all Our Southern Dead. Crowning this monumental shaft, the counterfeit presentment of a simple Confederate soldier, fashioned so true to life by cunning art, that we almost catch the merry quip or wild, defiant yell, looks down upon the serried graves of sleeping comrades from the Old North State, from the rice-fields of Carolina, from the cotton-lands of Georgia and Alabama, from Arkansas and Mississippi, from the savannahs of Florida and Louisiana, from happy homesteads on the banks of the Cumberland, and from that teeming empire beyond the Father of Waters, whose Lone Star banner has ever blazed in Glory's van—a mighty patriot host, who, at the trumpet call of duty put aside the clinging arms of wives and little ones, or turned from aged sires and weeping mothers to attest upon these distant fields their fidelity to constitutional liberty, and who here upon Virginia's soi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Lieutenants. (search)
exas. William R. Cox, North Carolina. George D. Dibbrell, Tennessee. H. B. Davidson, Tennessee. T. P. Dockery, Arkansas. Thomas F. Drayton, Charlotte, N. C. Basil W. Duke, Louisville, Ky. John Echols, Louisville, Ky. C. A. Evans, Ats Senate. William M. Gardner, Memphis. James M. Goggin, Austin, Texas. G. W. Gordon, Nashville, Tenn. E. C. Govan, Arkansas. Richard Griffith, Mississippi. J. Warren Grigsby, Kentucky. Johnson Haygood, Barnswell, S. C. George P. Har A. Pryor, New York. Lucius E. Polk, Tennessee. J. B. Palmer, Tennessee. W. H. Parsons, Texas. N. B. Pearce, Arkansas. E. W. Pettus, Selma, Ala. Albert Pike, Washington, D. C. W. A. Quarles, Clarksville. Tenn. B. H. Robertson, Washi. Daniel Ruggles, Fredericksburg, Va. George W. Rains, Augusta, Ga. A. E. Reynolds, Mississippi. D. H. Reynolds, Arkansas. R. V. Richardson, Tennessee. William P. Roberts, Raleigh, N. C. L. S. Ross, Austin, Tex. Thomas M. Scott, Louis