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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
udents in our catalogue was 430. Of these, 245 were from North Carolina, 29 from Tennessee, 28 from Louisiana, 28 from Mississippi, 26 from Alabama, 24 from South Carolina, 17 from Texas, 14 from Georgia, 5 from Virginia, 4 from Florida, 2 from Arkansas, 2 from Kentucky, 2 from Missouri, 2 from California, 1 from Iowa, 1 from New Mexico, 1 from Ohio. They were distributed in the four classes as follows: Seniors 84, Juniors 102, Sophomores 125, Freshmen 80. Of the eight young men who receiver and published in the North Carolina University Magazine, 1887-91, and from other miscellaneous sources, chiefly correspondence: Total number of Confederate dead, 312. by place of residence at time of matriculation in the University. Arkansas,1 California,1 Iowa,1 Missouri,1 Texas,4 South Carolina,5 Georgia,7 Virginia,8 Florida,9 Mississippi,11 Tennessee,11 Louisiana,14 Alabama,18 North Carolina,221 By occupation : Editors,2 Civil Engineers,5 Preachers,8 M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
ous check at Yellow Bayou, owing to the greater part of the infantry supporting Taylor having been withdrawn and sent to Arkansas in pursuit of Steele. The army was waiting for hostilities to reopen. Another attempted invasion by way of Louisiana, Arkansas, or the Gulf coast was expected, and but few realized that the war was nearly over. During the last year of the war communication with the CisMis-sissippi Department was almost entirely cut off, and the ports on the Gulf coast were blocka On April 29th Governor Henry Watkins Allen, of Louisiana, issued a ringing address to the soldiers of Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas and Missouri, calling upon them to unite in a solemn pledge to stand as patriots and freemen firmly to the holy cause, ih, Generals Smith, Magruder, Walker, Hardeman and Bee, who were joined there by Generals Price, of Missouri; Hindman, of Arkansas, and Early of Virginia. General Joe Shelby, of Missouri, fulfilled his promise by leading a portion of his command into
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Autobiography of Gen. Patton Anderson, C. S. A. (search)
re soon after added. I was immediately ordered to the front of Corinth in the direction of Monterey and Pittsburg Landing. At the battle of Shiloh my brigade consisted of the 17th, 19th and 20th Louisiana regiments, the 9th Texas, the 1st Florida, and Clack's Louisiana battalion, with the 5th Company of Washington Artillery of New Orleans. Soon after the battle of Shiloh, Hindman was assigned to the command of Ruggle's division, but only exercised it a few days when he was ordered to Arkansas, and the command devolved upon me as senior brigadier. I commanded the division in the retreat from Corinth till we reached Clear Creek, near Baldwin, where I was taken ill with fever, and Major-General Sam Jones was assigned to the division. I rejoined the division at Tupelo, Miss., where the army was reorganized, and I commanded a brigade in Sam Jones's division till we reached Chattanooga, Tenn., in August of that year, preparatory to the Kentucky campaign. In August, 1862, while e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
we toyed with that day was loaded; loaded to kill. The same with the enemy. It was a Yankee shell at Helena, fired from the gunboat Tyler, which placed me on the retired list, where I have been since July 4, 1863. I was an officer in Fagan's Arkansas brigade and I never enjoyed a picnic beforehand in my life, as I did that stealthy 1oo-mile march from Little Rock to give the Yankees in their works at Helena a Fourth of July surprise party. You see, we had been lying idle all summer in Arkansas, while Grant closed the coils around our people at Vicksburg. We numbered about 8,000 men, consisting of our brigade, two brigades of Pap Price's Missourians, and Marmaduke's cavalry, and Joe Shelby's brigade counted in. Holmes was our commander, and one day he telegraphed to army headquarters, I believe we can take Helena. Please let me attack it. The reply was, Go ahead and do it! Should we take Helena, why Grant would simply have to call off his dogs at Vicksburg, and sick Thi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate armies. (search)
ed by the official records. As far as I am able to judge, this volume, by comparison with others of like character, is the most accurate and complete, and by far the most impartial work of the kind published since the war by the northern press. Colonel Fox gives the following: Strength of the Confederate armies. Alabama—Fifty-five regiments and eleven battalions of infantry; five regiments of cavalry; three regiments of partisan rangers, and sixteen batteries of light artillery. Arkansas—Thirty-five regiments and twelve battalions of infantry; six regiments and two battalions of cavalry, and fifteen batteries of light artillery. Florida—Ten regiments and two battalions of infantry; two regiments and one battalion of cavalry, and six batteries of light artillery. Georgia—Sixty-eight regiments and seventeen battalions of infantry; eleven regiments and two battalions of cavalry; one regiment and one battalion of partisan rangers; two battalions of heavy artillery, and t