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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
d them as hostages to the end that they should be murdered in cold blood should any of his soldiers be killed by unknown persons, whom he designated as bushwackers. On the very day of the signing of the cartel for the exchange of prisoners between the Federal and Confederate authorities (July 22, 1862), the Federal Secretary of War, by order of Mr. Lincoln, issued an order to the military commanders in Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas, directing them to seize and use any property belonging to the inhabitants of the Confederacy, which might be necessary or convenient for their several commands, and no provision was made for any compensation to the owners of private property thus seized and appropriated. This order was such a flagrant violation of the rules of civilized warfare—those adopted by the Federal government itself, as hereinbefore quoted—that the Confederate government sought to prevent it being carried into e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
d them as hostages to the end that they should be murdered in cold blood should any of his soldiers be killed by unknown persons, whom he designated as bushwackers. On the very day of the signing of the cartel for the exchange of prisoners between the Federal and Confederate authorities (July 22, 1862), the Federal Secretary of War, by order of Mr. Lincoln, issued an order to the military commanders in Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas, directing them to seize and use any property belonging to the inhabitants of the Confederacy, which might be necessary or convenient for their several commands, and no provision was made for any compensation to the owners of private property thus seized and appropriated. This order was such a flagrant violation of the rules of civilized warfare—those adopted by the Federal government itself, as hereinbefore quoted—that the Confederate government sought to prevent it being carried into e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
derate flag which was put upon her. The attacking Federals, under the command of Captain Frederick Crocker, had nineteen well equipped gunboats, three steamships and three sloops of war. It is presumed the steamships and sloops were transports, as they took no part in the engagement. What the Federal design was in its attack at Sabine Pass is mere conjecture, as the departments at Washington have never revealed it, but there is reason to believe that their intention was to invade Texas, Arkansas and North Louisiana. A plan had been laid by General Banks somewhat to this effect, and judging from the number of troops, 15,000, it is supposed this was the time the scheme was to be accomplished. When we remember that only forty-two brave men foiled him, too much honor cannot be paid to their memory, and we, the United Daughters of the Confederacy of Beaumont, have named our chapter for their leader, Lieutenant Dowling. There are only two survivors of this wonderful battle, but man
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
bout the close of the civil war on a mission to the Emperor Napoleon, with authority to offer a transfer of Louisiana to France in exchange for his intervention in favor of the Confederacy is not a lost chapter, for the good and sufficient reason that no such chapter was ever written, and, therefore, could not well be lost. Mr. Davis was always a great stickler for adhering to the Constitution, and he clearly had no constitutional authority to propose such a transfer. Moreover, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Missouri were three of the States belonging to the Confederacy, though at the time largely occupied by the Federal troops, and their soldiers were performing their duties in the Confederate army with singular zeal, fortitude and heroism. The suggestion to turn over these soldiers, their homes, and liberties to any European government in order to save the other States from being overrun would not have been entertained for a moment by Mr. Davis or any one of his Cabinet. Prince Polign