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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies, has given fresh impulse to the study of the short but brilliant career of the Confederate armored ram, Arkansas. The scene of her engagements was on the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers, near and at Vicksburg, and in the vicinity of Baton Rouge. The heroic fighting of four d and by the Tennessee in Mobile Bay, August, 1864. But it is no disparagement of the gallant fighting on board of those last boats to say that the record of the Arkansas is sufficient to put her first of all, among the three armored rams. It is not too much to say that the Arkansas was the dread of the Union fleet on the MississArkansas was the dread of the Union fleet on the Mississippi River; and that it was feared she might clear the river between Vicksburg and New Orleans, recapturing the latter city for the Confederate cause. This she might have done, but for the hopeless breaking down of her engines and the destruction of the vessel by her own crew. It is easy now to see that she should not have been
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Naval situation at Vicksburg. (search)
tains reported truly: We are now in possession of the Mississippi from its source to its mouth, with the exception of the short interval that separates our two fleets. (At Vicksburg.) Even communication between them is reported to be uninterrupted. There were, in fact, as many as four fleets under command of Flag Officer D. G. Farragut, soon to be made an admiral. To give, in this limited sketch, full particulars of ships, armored rams, mortar boats, etc., and their several armanents, is out of the question. The total number of fighting crafts of all kinds before Vicksburg, flying the Union flag, may be estimated at fifty or more. Against these formidable foes the Confederate navy was represented by the armored ram Arkansas alone. The shore batteries of Vicksburg were, of course, on her side, as long as she was within range or needed their protection. The sight of the town is a high bluff, on the left bank of the river, and in the re-entrant of a sharp turn in the Mississippi.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Building and Commissioning of the Arkansas. (search)
l Van Dorn. From the navy department orders were sent to First Lieut Isaac N. Brown, C. S. N., to assume command of the Arkansas and finish the vessel without regard to expenditure of men or money. It was provided by President Davis that complete cance and hard labor, the ability of her commander, officers, crew and workmen. No one can appreciate the history of the Arkansas without doing full justice to the arduous work of those six weeks of preparation up the Yazoo. Besides the construction, was a labor of the heaviest sort, in the exhausting heat of the season. On June 20, 1862, the Confederate steamer Arkansas, having been completed according to the material at the disposal of her commander, Isaac N. Brown, left Yazoo City and d earthwork and raft of logs were in position to prevent the Federal fleet from ascending the river. The officers of the Arkansas were: Lieut. I. N. Brown, commanding; First Lieut. Henry K. Stevens, executive officer; Lieuts. John Grimball, A. D. Wha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The first action of the Arkansas. (search)
The first action of the Arkansas. On the morning of July 15, 1862, the Arkansas arrived at the mouth of Old River, and seeing three Federal gunboats lying off a point below, she was headed foened fire with her bow guns. (7 A. M.) They replied, one shot shattering the pilot house of the Arkansas, mortally mounding Pilot John Hodges and slightly injuring by splinters Commander Brown and Piltern guns as they retreated. The third the iron-clad Carondelet, fought her bow guns until the Arkansas approached her at close quarters, when she also turned to follow her consorts. The Arkansas rArkansas ranged up alongside her and, pouring a broadside into her with her port guns, compelled the Carondelet to strike her colors and run ashore in a sinking and crippled condition. John A. Wilson. Lieubout yelling and cheering, he writes, You should have heard it at the moment on the deck of the Arkansas to have appreciated it. In fifteen (thirty) minutes, without being checked in our progress, we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second action of the Arkansas. (search)
ppi above Vicksburg. By 8:45 A. M. they were all engaged with the Arkansas standing down past the fleet. As before, the narrative from the pparedness of the combined Federal fleets above Vicksburg. Why the Arkansas took her foes so much by surprise is almost unaccountable. Flag O, notwithstanding my prediction to the contrary, the iron-clad ram Arkansas has at length made her appearance and taken us by surprise. * * * squadron should be wiped out by the capture or destruction of the Arkansas. The achievement of passing through the fire of such a fleet, he following compliment was issued to the officers and crew of the Arkansas: Lieut Brown and the officers and crew of the Confederate steamer Arkansas, by their heroic attack upon the Federal fleet before Vicksburg, equalled the highest recorded examples of courage and skill. Tnear Vicksburg, in the brilliant and successful engagement of the sloop of war Arkansas with the enemy's fleet. Approved October 2, 1862.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Third action of the Arkansas. (search)
, with the intention of passing below the town, and at the same time endeavoring to destroy the Arkansas, if possible. She lay under the bluff in the darkness, and being painted a dark brown color couns. The batteries above us opened fire on the fleet as soon as they got within range, and the Arkansas joined in the duel when they began passing her line of fire. The enemy's gunners were guided srge vessels struck into the channel and descended the river. As each boat arrived opposite the Arkansas, she slakened and poured her broadside into her. She answered as well as she could in such a st took up their old anchorage. In the morning messengers were dispatched to see what damage the Arkansas had sustained. By going up the opposite bank of the river, she could be plainly seen. Two bahrough before had failed to demolish her. With a Union fleet, thus, above and below her, the Arkansas continued to be exposed to a daily and nightly shelling by 13-inch mortars from the 16th to the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Fourth action of the Arkansas. (search)
of the Essex to make an effort to destroy the Arkansas; and the following programme was agreed on: al fleet. She was, in appearance, unlike the Arkansas, having sloping sides and shields fore and afhe West, already met and put to flight by the Arkansasin the early morning fight on the Yazoo River.llows: A more opportune moment to destroy the Arkansas could not have been chosen, as many of her ofrom the smoke above and made directly for the Arkansas. Commander Brown received the attack at anchrly touching each other, the broadside of the Arkansas was exchanged for the bow guns of the Essex.10-inch solid shorts struck the armor of the Arkansas. * * * killing eight men and wounding six, hats; and, but for the short-handed crew of the Arkansas, would not have escaped capture. The Queenircumstances, was the best achievement of the Arkansas. —Lieut. Gift. Notwithstanding her severe fiery ordeal of those two great battles, the Arkansas could be seen, almost daily, steaming up and [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The end of the Arkansas. (search)
th Gen. Breckinridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. Commander Brown sent positive orders to Lieut. Stevens not to move his vessel until he could join it, as the Arkansas was not ready for action. * * Lieut. Stevens referred the matter for his decision to Capt. William F. Lynch, the senior officer of the Confederate States navy in the West. Ignorant or regardless of the condition of the Arkansas, Capt. Lynch ordered Lieut. Stevens to disobey the instructions of commander Brown and comply with the request of Van Dorn. It this way the Arkansas was placed under the command of Lieut. Stevens, with orders to run 300 miles against time. (Note in A long runys: I think it due to the truth of history to correct the error, industriously spread by the official reports of the enemy, touching the destruction of the Arkansas. She was no trophy won by the Essex nor did she receive any injury at Baton Rouge from the hands of any of her adversaries. * * * With every gun shotted, our fl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summary. (search)
Summary. 15th July, 1862, 7 to 8 A. M., the Arkansas disabled the Carondalet and chased two other boats down the Yazoo to the fleet; 8 to 9 A. M., ran through fleet of nearly forty armored vessels of safety to Vicksburg; caused burning of a mortar boat; 9 to 10 P. M., received fire of fleet passing from above to combine with lower fleet, and repelled attack by the ram Sumter. 22d July, repelled attacks by rams, the Essex retreating down the river, and Queen of the West retreating up thssels of safety to Vicksburg; caused burning of a mortar boat; 9 to 10 P. M., received fire of fleet passing from above to combine with lower fleet, and repelled attack by the ram Sumter. 22d July, repelled attacks by rams, the Essex retreating down the river, and Queen of the West retreating up the river. Before the end of July, the seige of Vicksburg had been raised by the departure of one fleet up the river, and of the other down the river. The Arkansas was master of the situation.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
Butt, J. W., Lt., Va., Richmond, Va., 1862. Cabell, J. C., Lt., Va., Richmond, Va., 1863. Cardwell, J. R., Va., Augusta, Ga., 1864. Carr, J. G., Lt., Va., Dry Creek, Va., 1863. Carr, W. C., Lt., Va., Seven Pines, Va., 1863. Carr, J. G., Va. Carrington, W. C. P., Capt., Va., Edwards Depot, Miss., 1863. Carter, J. C., Brig. Gen., Ga., Franklin, Tenn., 1864. Carey, G. M., Va., Gloucester Co., Va., 1862. Carson, S. M., Surg., Va., Tennessee. Charles, F. E., La., Arkansas, 186-. Chalmers, J., Va., Fairfax, Va., 1861. Chalmers, H. C., Asst. Surg., Va., 1865. Chapman, G. B., Capt., Va., Winchester, Va., 186-. Chew, R. E., Col., Miss., Prairie Grove, Va., 186-. Christian, H. B., Lt., Miss., Appomattox, Va., 1865. Clark, P. H., Capt., Va., Richmond, Va., 1862. Clay, C. G., Va., Spotsylvania C. H., 1864. Cleaver, W. H., Capt., Ark., Rio Grande River, 1862. Cochran, J. L., Va., 1862. Cocke, P. St. Geo., Va., Brig. Gen., Va., 1861.
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