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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1861.., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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of free, equal and sovereign States. Our loved and honored brethren of North Carolina and Tennessee have consummated the action, foreseen and provided for at your last session, and I have had the gratification of announcing, by proclamation, in conformity with law, that those States were admitted into the Confederacy. The people of Virginia, also, by a majority previously unknown in her history, have ratified the action of her Convention, uniting her fortunes with ours. The States of Arkansas, North Carolina and Virginia have likewise adopted the permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, and no doubt is entertained of its adoption by Tennessee at the election to be held early next month. I deemed it advisable to direct the removal of the several Executive Departments, with their archives, to this city, to which you had removed the seat of Government, immediately after your adjournment. The aggression movements of the enemy required prompt and energetic action. The
direction of the President, the roll of the Confederate States was called alphabetically, and the following named members were ascertained to be present: From Alabama.--R. H. Smith, J. L. M. Curry, Nich. P. Davis and H. C. Jones. From Arkansas.--Robert W. Johnson, H. F. Thomasson, A. H. Garland and W. W. Watkins. From Florida.--None. From Georgia.--Robert Toombs, Howell Cobb, Eugenius A. Nisbet, Benjamin H. Hill, A. R. Wright and Augustus H. Kenan. From Louisiana--John tee to inform the President that a quorum is present and ready to receive any communication he may be pleased to make. The motion being sustained, the Chair appointed Messrs Perkins, of Louisiana, Brockenbrough, of Virginia, and Johnson, of Arkansas, to constitute such committee. During the absence of the committee, Mr. Toombs, from the Committee on Ways and Means, introduced a bill entitled an act to authorise the appointment of agents to sign treasury notes, which was read in due ord
f the movements of the Arkansas troops: Capt. Conrad's command, which had been left at Neosho, report that on the 5th of July they were surrounded by 1,500 Arkansas troops, and were given fifteen minutes time to surrender. Before the time expired the enemy's force was increased to 3,000. Capt. Conrad then surrendered his command. Ben McCullough was present. Gen. Price and Gov. Jackson then demanded that their men and arms be delivered to the Missouri troops. The Arkansas officers refused this demand. Afterwards Capt. Emmett McDonald passed among them and inquired if they were not St. Louis boys. They replied they were. The Captain then treated a number of them to lager beer. They were then sent off, after taking the obligation not to bear arms against the Southern Confederacy, under the escort of Arkansas troops, as it was understood that the Missourians intended to murder them. The escort accompanied them some thirty miles, when they were left to find their