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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 102 6 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 1, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Plattsburg (New York, United States) or search for Plattsburg (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 54 results in 30 document sections:

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to colonel, and Winfield Scott, Edward Pendleton Gaines, and Eleazer W. Ripley were commissioned colonels. In the summer of 1812, Gen. Joseph Bloomfield was sent to Lake Champlain with several regiments, and on September 1 he had gathered at Plattsburg about 8,000 men — regulars, volunteers, and militia — besides small advanced parties at Chazy and Champlain. General Dearborn took direct command of this army soon afterwards, and about the middle of November he made an unsuccessful attempt tobeen engaged in it. Hampton refused to meet Wilkinson at St. Regis, as the latter had requested after the battle at Chrysler's Field. Wilkinson directed Hampton to join the camp at French Mills. This order, also, he disobeyed, and retired to Plattsburg with his army of 4,000 men. Army of occupation, 1845-46. When the annexation of Texas caused warlike preparations in Mexico, Gen. Zachary Taylor was ordered to proceed to a point near the frontier between the two countries to defend Texas
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
ay 30, 1814 Odell TownJune 28, 1814 Fort ErieJuly 3, 1814 ChippewaJuly 5, 1814 ChamplainJuly 18 and 19, Lundy's Lane (Niagara Falls)July 25, 1814 Fort Mackinack (Mackinaw)Aug. 4, 1814 Fort ErieAug. 13-15, 1814 BladensburgAug. 24, 1814 PlattsburgSept. 11, 1814 North PointSept. 12, 1814 Fort McHenry (Bombardment of)Sept. 13, 1814 Fort BowerSept. 15, 1814 Fort Erie (Sortie from)Sept. 17, 1814 ChippewaOct. 15, 1814 Lyon's CreekOct. 19, 1814 PensacolaNov. 7, 1814 Villere‘s Plantatioay 30, 1814 Odell TownJune 28, 1814 Fort ErieJuly 3, 1814 ChippewaJuly 5, 1814 ChamplainJuly 18 and 19, Lundy's Lane (Niagara Falls)July 25, 1814 Fort Mackinack (Mackinaw)Aug. 4, 1814 Fort ErieAug. 13-15, 1814 BladensburgAug. 24, 1814 PlattsburgSept. 11, 1814 North PointSept. 12, 1814 Fort McHenry (Bombardment of)Sept. 13, 1814 Fort BowerSept. 15, 1814 Fort Erie (Sortie from)Sept. 17, 1814 ChippewaOct. 15, 1814 Lyon's CreekOct. 19, 1814 PensacolaNov. 7, 1814 Villere's Planta
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burns, John, 1793-1872 (search)
Burns, John, 1793-1872 Military officer; born in Burlington, N. J., Sept. 5, 1793; served in the War of 1812-15, taking part in the engagements at Plattsburg, Queenston, and Lund's Lane. He endeavored to enlist for the Mexican War, but being rejected on account of his age went with the army as a teamster. In 1863, when the Confederate scouts entered Gettysburg, he joined a party to oppose them, but was turned back by the National cavalry. He took an active part in the subsequent battle of Gettysburg, and when the report of his participation reached the Northern States it aroused much interest and he was hailed as the hero of Gettysburg. He died in Gettysburg, Pa., Feb. 7, 1872.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Champlain, Lake, operations on (search)
100. The captured sloops were refitted, and named, respectively, Finch and Chubb. They were engaged in the battle off Plattsburg the next year, when McDonough recaptured them. For a while the British were masters of Lake Champlain. This loss stimmed three sloops and six gunboats. At the close of July a British armament, under Col. J. Murray, attacked defenceless Plattsburg. It was composed of soldiers, sailors, and marines, conveyed in two The Royal savage. this engraving was made fro distant, with 4,000 troops, made no attempt to oppose the invaders. The block-house, arsenal, armory, and hospital at Plattsburg were destroy- Scene of Arnold's naval battle. this scene is between Port Kent and Plattsburg, on Lake Champlain. WPlattsburg, on Lake Champlain. Western shore. On the left is seen a point of the mainland: on the right a part of Valcour Island. Between these Arnold formed his little fleet for action. ed; also private store-houses. The value of public property wasted was $25,000, and of priv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custom-house, (search)
t, New Bedford, Newburyport, Plymouth. Salem. Michigan—Detroit, Grand Haven, Grand Rapids. Marquette, Port Huron. Minnesota—Duluth, St. Paul. Mississippi—Natchez, Shieldsborough, Vicksburg. Missouri—Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis. Montana—Fort Benton. Nebraska—Omaha. New Hampshire—Portsmouth. New Jersey—Bridgeton, Newark, Perth Amboy, Somers Point, Trenton, Tuckerton. New York—Albany, Buffalo, Cape Vincent, Dunkirk, New York, Ogdensburg, Oswego, Patchogue, Plattsburg, Port Jefferson, Rochester, Sag Harbor, Suspension Bridge. North Carolina—Beaufort, Edenton, Newberne, Wilmington. Ohio–Cincinnati, Columbus, Cleveland, Sandusky, Toledo. Oregon–Astoria, Empire City, Portland, Yaquina. Pennsylvania–Erie, Philadelphia, Pittsburg. Rhode Island—Bristol, Newport, Providence. South Carolina—Beaufort, Charleston, Georgetown. Tennessee—Chattanooga, Memphis. Texas–Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Eagle Pass, El Paso,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dearborn, Henry, 1751- (search)
he port of Boston, when he was appointed senior major-general in the United States army, and commander-in-chief of the Northern Department. On Sept. 1, 1812, General Bloomfield had collected about 8,000 men—regulars, volunteers, and militia—at Plattsburg, on Lake Champlain, besides some small advanced parties at Chazy and Champlain. On the arrival of General Dearborn, he assumed direct command of all the troops, and on Nov. 16 he moved towards the Canada line with 3,000 regulars and 2,000 miliy approaching with an overwhelming force. These were fiercely attacked, but the Americans were soon forced to retreat so precipitately that they left five of their number dead and five wounded on the field. The army, disheartened, returned to Plattsburg. Dearborn was superseded July 6, 1813, in consequence of being charged with political intrigue. He asked in vain for a court of inquiry. In 1822-24 he was the American minister in Portugal, and in the latter year returned to his farm at Roxb
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Downie, George, 1812- (search)
Downie, George, 1812- Naval officer; born in Ross, Ireland; at an early age entered the British navy; in 1812 was given command of the squadron on the Lakes and commanded the British fleet at the battle of Plattsburg, in which he was killed, Sept. 11, 1814.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French Mills. (search)
o shelter but tents. Provisions were scarce, and the surrounding country was a wilderness. They were in the midst of the cold of a Canadian winter, for they were in lat. 45° N. In their distress they were tempted by British emissaries, who circulated placards among the soldiers containing the following words: notice. — All American soldiers who may wish to quit the unnatural war in which they are at present engaged will receive the arrears due them by the American government, to the extent of five months pay, on their arrival at the British outposts. No man shall be required to serve against his own country. It is believed that not a single soldier of American birth was enticed away by this allurement. In February, 1814, the army began to move away from their winter encampment. The flotilla was destroyed and the barracks burned. Brown, with a larger portion of the troops, marched for Sackett's Harbor, and the remainder accompanied Wilkinson, the commanderin-chief, to Plattsburg
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), La Colle Mill, battle of. (search)
La Colle Mill, battle of. In the winter of 1813-14 an American force under General Wilkinson was encamped at French Mills (afterwards Fort Covington) in Franklin county, N. Y. Early in 1814 a large portion of this force was withdrawn. A part were marched to Plattsburg. Soon afterwards, Feb. 28, a party of British soldiers advanced and destroyed some stores which the Americans had left behind. This invasion alarmed the whole frontier. Late in March La Colle Mill and Block-House. General Wilkinson attempted another invasion of Canada. He advanced up the western shore of Lake Champlain to the Canada frontier (March 30, 1814) with about 4,000 picked men. They soon encountered British pickets, and drove them back. In the afternoon the Americans came in sight of La Colle Mill, a heavy stone structure, its windows barricaded with timbers, through which were loopholes for musketry. The British garrison at the mill consisted of only about 200 regulars, under Major Hancock. The
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ladue, Joseph 1854- (search)
Ladue, Joseph 1854- Miner; born in Plattsburg, N. Y., in 1854. When twenty years old he went West, where he engaged in mining, becoming an expert. Subsequently he went to Alaska, and after remaining there about fifteen years discovered the Klondike gold-fields, which soon became famous all over the world. On June 23, 1897, he mapped out and founded Dawson City, at the mouth of the Klondike River, on land which he had purchased from the government for $1.25 an acre. He was also the organizer of the Joseph Ladue Gold Mining and Development Company, one of the largest in that line. He died in Schuyler Falls, N. Y., June 26, 1901.
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