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lance, Stuart would have been careless of his person; but in the Southern struggle he was utterly reckless. This indifference to danger was evidently a trait of blood, and wholly unaffected. Nor, for a long time, did his incessant exposure of himself bring him so much as a scratch. On all the great battle-fields of Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, as well as in the close and bitter conflicts of his cavalry at Fleetwood, Auburn, Upperville, Middleburg, South Mountain, Monocacy, Williamsport, Shepherdstown, Paris, Barbee's, Jeffersonton, Culpeper Court-House, Brandy, Kelly's Ford, Spotsylvania — in these, and a hundred other hotly-contested actions, he was in the very thickest of the fight, cheering on the sharpshooters, directing his artillery, or leading his column in the charge, but was never hurt. Horses were shot under him, bullets struck his equipments, pierced his clothes, or cut off curls of his hair, as at Fredericksburg, but none ever wounded him. In the closest me
onthat his men would have given the Federal troops a reception such as they had given Pickett. The stubborn resolution of the Army of Northern Virginia was thus unbroken-but the game was played for the time. The army was moving back, slow and defiant, to the Potomac. The cavalry protected its flanks and rear, fighting in the passes of South Mountain, and holding obstinately the ridge in front of Boonsboro, while General Lee formed his line to cover the crossing at Falling Waters and Williamsport. Here, near Boonsboro, Stuart did some of his hardest fighting, and successfully held his ground, crowning every knoll with the guns of his horse artillery. When the infantry was in position, the cavalry retired, and took position on the flanks — the two armies faced each other, and a battle seemed imminent-when one morning General Meade discovered that General Lee was on the south bank of the Potomac. It is said that the Federal commander designed attacking Lee that day, against th
Jackson-he was not General or Stonewall yet-and had reported a few days before the engagement at Falling Waters. I need not inform you of the state of affairs at that time, further than to say that while Beauregard watched the enemy in front of Washington, with his headquarters at Manassas, Johnston held the Valley against Patterson, with his headquarters at Winchester. Well, it was late in June, I think, when intelligence came that General Patterson was about to cross the Potomac at Williamsport, and Colonel Jackson was sent forward with the First Brigade, as it was then called, to support Stuart's cavalry, and feel the enemy, but not bring on a general engagement. This, the Colonel proceeded to do with alacrity, and he had soon advanced north of Martinsburg, and camped near the little village of Hainesville-Stuart continuing in front watching the enemy on the river. This was the state of things, when suddenly one morning we were aroused by the intelligence that Patterson h