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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 80 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 76 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 20 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 16 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 10 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 10 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Pontus or search for Pontus in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1303a (search)
s is unknown. jointly with Troezenians, and afterwards the Achaeans having become more numerous expelled the Troezenians, which was the Cause of the curse that fell on the Sybarites; and at Thurii Sybarites quarrelled with those who had settled there with them, for they claimed to have the larger share in the country as being their own, and were ejected; and at Byzantium the additional settlers were discovered plotting against the colonists and were expelled by force of arms; and the people of AntissaIn Lesbos. after admitting the Chian exiles expelled them by arms; and the people of ZancleLater Messana, Messina. after admitting settlers from Samos were themselves expelled; and the people of Apollonia on the Euxine Sea after bringing in additional settlers fell into faction; and the Syracusans after the period of the tyrantsThrasybulus succeeded his brother Hiero as tyrant in 467 B.C. and fell within a year.
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1312a (search)
cause his power had waned and he himself was living luxuriously, and the Thracian Seuthes attacked AmadocusBoth these Thracian kings became allies of Athens 390 B.C., but the event referred to may be later. when his general. Others again attack monarchs for more than one of these motives, for instance both because they despise them and for the sake of gain, as MithridatesPerhaps Mithridates II., who succeeded his father Ariobarzanes as satrap of Pontus 336 B.C. attacked Ariobarzanes.The following sentence may have been shifted by mistake from the end of 8.14 above. And it is men of bold nature and who hold a military office with monarchs who most often make the attempt for this reason; for courage possessing power is boldness,and they make their attacks thinking that with courage and power they will easily prevail. But with those whose attack is prompted by ambition the motive operates in a different way fro
Aristotle, Politics, Book 8, section 1338b (search)
te the question whether this virtue is to be had in view at all. For neither in the lower animals nor in the case of foreign races do we see that courage goes with the wildest, but rather with the gentler and lion-like temperaments.Aristot. Hist. An. 629b 8 (the lion is gentle except when hungry); Plat. Soph. 231a (the dog the gentlest of animals). And there are manyforeign races inclined to murder and cannibalism, for example among the tribes of the Black Sea the Achaeans and Heniochi, and others of the mainland races, some in the same degree as those named and some more, which although piratical have got no share of manly courage. And again we know that even the Spartans, although so long as they persisted by themselves in their laborious exercises they surpassed all other peoples, now fall behind others both in gymnastic and in military contests; for they used not to excel because they exercised their young m