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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 44 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 10 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 10 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for Lydia (Turkey) or search for Lydia (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 2 (search)
tus. All these came to Cyrus at Sardis. Meanwhile Tissaphernes had taken note of these proceedings and come to the conclusion that Cyrus' preparations were too extensive to be against the Pisidians; he accordingly made his way to the King as quickly as he could, with about five hundred horsemen. And when the King heard from Tissaphernes about Cyrus' array, he set about making counter-preparations.Cyrus was now setting forth from Sardis with the troops I have mentioned; and he marched through Lydia three stages,staqmo/s = lit. a stopping-place, hence a day's journey. a distance of twenty-two parasangs,A Persian measure of distance, equivalent to 30 Greek stadia, or about 3.3 English miles. to the Maeander river. The width of this river was two plethra,The plethrum = about 97 English feet. and there was a bridge over it made of seven boats. After crossing the Maeander he marched through Phrygia one stage, a distance of eight parasangs, to Colossae, an inhabitedMany of the cities of Asia
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 9 (search)
fondest of incurring danger in his pursuit of wild animals. On one occasion, when a bear charged upon him, he did not take to flight, but grappled with her and was dragged from his horse; he received some injuries, the scars of which he retained, but in the end he killed the bear; and, furthermore, the man who was the first to come to his assistance he made an object of envy to many. Again, when he was sent downSee Introd., p. vii, note 1; also Xen. Anab. 1.1.2. by his father to be satrap of Lydia, Greater Phrygia, and Cappadocia and was also appointed commander of all the troops whose duty it is to muster in the plain of Castolus, he showed, in the first place, that he counted it of the utmost importance, when he concluded a treaty or compact with anyone or made anyone any promise, under no circumstances to prove false to his word. It was for this reason, then, that the cities trusted him and put themselves under his protection,See Xen. Anab. 1.1.6 fin. and that individuals also trus
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 3, chapter 5 (search)
army went after provisions, the generals held another meeting, at which they brought together the prisoners that had been taken and enquired of them about each district of all the surrounding country. The prisoners said that the region to the south lay on the road towards Babylon and Media, the identical province they had just passed through; that the road to the eastward led to Susa and Ecbatana, where the King is said to spend his summers; across the river and on to the west was the way to Lydia and Ionia; while the route through the mountains and northward led to the country of the Carduchians. These Carduchians, they said, dwelt up among the mountains, were a warlike people, and were not subjects of the King; in fact, a royal army of one hundred and twenty thousand men had once invaded them, and, by reason of the ruggedness of the country, not a man of all that number came back. Still, whenever they made a treaty with the satrap in the plain, some of the people of the plain did ha
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 8 (search)
ame out of it in safety, with about two hundred slaves and sheep enough for sacrificial victims. The next day Xenophon offered sacrifice, and then by night led forth the entire army with the intention of making as long a march as possible through Lydia, to the end that Asidates might not be fearful on account of their nearness, but be off his guard. Asidates, however, hearing that Xenophon had sacrificed again with a view to attacking him and that he was to come with the entire army, left his tus. The MSS. add the following statistical notes, which, like the summaries prefixed to the several books, must have been the contribution of a late editor.[The governors of all the King's territories that we traversed were as follows: Artimas of Lydia, Artacamas of Phrygia, Mithradates of Lycaonia and Cappadocia, Syennesis of Cilicia, Dernes of Phoenicia and Arabia, Belesys of Syria and Assyria, Rhoparas of Babylon, Arbacas of Media, Tiribazus of the Phasians and Hesperites; then the Carduchia